Country Holidays
No 50201
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Liv's Road

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Kaltene features several homes where shipbuilders used to live – Caurnāši, which was home to the Bertliņi family, Ilmati, where six ailing ships were built, Maizītes, where the Stahl family of ship builders built 16 two-mast and three-mast ships, and Dambekalni, which was once one of the first canned fish factories on the coastline.  To the side of the sea are the old boat piers of Kaltene.  In 1936, a board pier was built by the Freijs family from Roja.  It was 200 m long and had room for some 50 boats.  All that is left are wooden poles that have been eaten away by the sea and time.  If you want to learn about the specifics, difficulties and challenges of fishermen today, visit Ervīns Vilciņš in Ķirķrags.  He will tell interesting stories on the basis of his experience.  You can watch as he fishes in the morning and then taste the fish that he has caught. (Source: Roja TIC)

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In a document from 1387, the village is named Minor Irva.  Until the mid-20th century, Mazirbe was the largest Livonian village on the coast of Kurzeme.  It was a fishing village and a centre for fishing.  The village had a church, school, pharmacy, forestry company, several stores, a post and telegraph office, train station, barber shop, bakery and photo workshop, as well as a brick kiln.  During the 1930s, a local fishing co-operative built a fish processing plant here.  The Livonian Association was established here in 1923, and the Livonian People's Centre was opened in 1939.  Oppoite the centre is the Stūrīši homestead (the home of the Taizel dynasty), where you can learn about everyday household objects and, by ordering it advance, taste local foods.  The first chairmen of the Livonian Association, Kārlis Stalte and Māritņš Lepste, lived in Mazirbe.  Cultural worker Kārlis Stalte (1870-1978) spent man years as the verger and organist of a church in Mazirbe.  Mārtiņš Lepste was a Livonian language teacher in the 1930s.  The former Maritime School building can be viewed from the outside.  Some 2,000 students attended the school between 1894 and 1914.  During Soviet years, the army had a base here.

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This collection contains bicycles from five different armies and five different eras in the history of Latvia. They include a World War I bicycle from the Russian Empire, a bicycle from the Latvian army, two World War II German bicycles, and a Monark-brand military bicycle from Sweden that was donated to the renewed Latvian army in the 1990s. The exhibition also features items that are related to the use of military bicycles – seals, awards, and information about the bicycle units of Latvia’s Home Guard. This is the only bicycle museum in Latvia, and its exhibits are unique, as well.
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This is an ancient populated area.  There were 50 homesteads here during the 1930s, with only ten remaining in 1990.  The Livonian scholar and entomologist Kārlis Princis (1893-1978) was born in Oviši.  In 1944, he emigrated to Sweden.  The Oviši lighthouse (1814) is 38 metres high and is the oldest functioning lighthouse in Latvia.  There are lovely views from the top of the lighthouse.  The building in which employees of the lighthouse used to live was erected in 1905 and has been preserved.  A narrow-gauge train station was in the building at one time.  The Oviši Lighthouse Museum is nearby, as is the metal Tree of Austra.  Opposite Cape Oviši is a great place for bird watching. 

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Valdemārpils is a small and quiet town along the shore of Lake Sasmaka.  A village of craftsmen and merchants was established on the land of the Sasmaka Estate in the 17th century.  There were quite a few Jewish merchants and craftsmen in towns in Kurzeme during the mid-19th century, and Sasmaka was known as their capital city.  The city was named Valdemārpils in 1926.  Its historical 19th century centre is a monument to urban construction.  The town has a Lutheran church, an Orthodox church, a former synagogue, a monument to Krišjānis Valdemārs, and an outstanding linden tree.

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The White Dune is one of the landmarks of Saulkrasti, on the Vidzeme gulf coast. The dune offers a splendid view of the sea, the mouth of the Inčupe River and the vast beach. The White Dune formed as the wind drove beach sand over the clay silt of Baltic Ice Lake. Its white 18 meters high sand outcrop once helped local fishermen find their way home. The dune got its name from its white, hardened layers of sand which look like sandstone.
In White Dune are set up following Nature Design objects: "Entrance gates" which symbolizes White Dune and its fragility. On the wall of this object an information about White Dune are exposed. "Frīda the Hedgehog" and "Fredis the Rabbit"- both objects invite people to be polite when visiting nature sites and not to throw rubbish on the ground as well as to be quiet in the forest. "The bug trail" which helps to understand that humans are not the only one creatures in the nature. "Listening device" which is made in the form of trumpet and helps to listen into the sounds of sea and wind. The approximately 4 kilometers long Sunset Trail winds from the White Dune to the center of Saulkrasti.

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(formerly Pize and Pizā in Livonian).  The current name of the village comes from a lighthouse (Mihailovskii majak) that was built during the age of the Russian Empire and named for the nephew of Tsar Alexander II.  The lighthouse that is there now is the third one to be built on the site.  It was built in 1957 and is the highest lighthouse in Latvia (57 m, can only be viewed from the outside).  The Lutheran church in Mikeļtornis was built in 1893, and nearby is the Pize Saloon (1857), which is terrible condition.  The saloon has a typical design from the 19th century and is the only venue of its type on the Livonian coastline.  The first Livonian cultural activist, Jānis Princis (1796-1868), was born in Miķeļtornis, and he and son Jānis translated the Gospel of Matthew into the Western Livonian language.  The two of them also wrote a collection of poetry, "Holy Songs and Prayers for Sailors."  The only poetry book in Latvia prior to that was published by Blind Indriķis.  A student of Vilhelms Purvītis, Livonian painter Andrejs Šulcs (1910-2006), was born at the Olmaņi homestead in Miķeļtornis.  A monument to Livonian poets was installed at the local cemetery in 1978 and was the first monument dedicated to Livonians.  There are plans to open an environmental object by artist Ģirts Burvis, "Century of Sailing Ships", in 2019.

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Open-air functional exhibition of medicinal plants introduces you to a “green pharmacy”. There are more than 300 different plants. Every healthy lifestyle enthusiast can find the secrets of fitotherapy and learn how to use the plants in many different ways – making sauna besoms, aromatic pillows, healthy teas, bath scrubs etc.
Facilities: excursion through medicinal plant garden and collection, tasting of green cocktails.

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is seen as the newest village along the Livonian coastline.  It was established during the 17th century.  Košrags had 78 residents in 1826.  The first reading school for Livonian children in the Dundaga seashore villages was opened at the Žoki homestead in 1832.  One of the teachers was Nika Polmanis, who was the first Livonian to have completed a professional education.  He also translated the Gospel of Matthew into the Eastern Livonian dialect.  Košrags had a windmill, water mill and boat building facility.  During the spring, job seekers from Saaremaa stopped here.  A port was installed in 1932, and a breakwater to collect sea fertiliser followed in 1938.  During the 1930s, Košrags was regularly visited by Finnish and Estonian linguists to study the folklore of the Livonians.  The Norpiedagi homestead was built by Livonian activist Didriķis Volganskis (1884-1968).  His son, Livonian cultural worker and pastor (in Finland) Edgars Vālgamā (Volganskis, 1912-2003) was born there.  He translated the Andrejs Pumpurs epic "Lāčplēsis" into Finnish.  Košrags today is a cultural monument of national importance.

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This is an organic farm, and visitors are invited to join in the fieldwork - gather hay, make sauerkraut, pull weeds, milk a goat, watch the geese, catch some fish and then smoke them in accordance with the farmer’s own recipe. Visitors can also help to bake bread. There’s a sauna where you can inhale the aroma of healthy grasses and drink some medicinal teas.
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The Kaltene Lutheran Church dates back to 1567, when Duke Gotthard Kettler of Courland ordered the construction of new churches in Kurzeme.  One of them was in Kaltene, and was known as the Church of St Catherine.  In 1848, a clay church was built in place of the old wooden church.  A sacristy was added in 1880, and the church was rebuilt and expanded in 1896.  It suffered much damage during World War I because a Russian mine ship attacked it.  The church was restored during the first half of the 1920s.  The altar painting, “Christ and St Peter on the Sea” was painted in 1898 by M Pohl after a panting by R. Richter.  The pulpit and organ date back to the 18th century and are cultural monuments of national importance.  The organ was built by August Martin in 1843, and it was initially in a church in Gulbene.  The instrument was brought to Kaltene in 1943 and is the oldest surviving instrument by Martin.  The bell was manufactured in 2006 by the Liepājas Metalurgs company, and a new building for the congregation was built in 2012 and 2013.  The first scenes of the feature film “Long Road to the Dunes” and the film “Forest of Bulrush” were filmed outside the gates of the church.  Nearby is the Putniņi homestead.  In 1921, Culture Minister Rainis visited the homestead.  At that time there was a store there.  The Germans burned down the homestead during World War II. (Source: Roja TIC)

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 A long village stretching along both banks of the Lūžņa River.  In 1937, there were 36 houses and two boat piers here.  During the 1860s, ships were built here, but during the Soviet occupation, there were military bases there.  During the 1930s, the village was visited several times by the Finnish linguist Lauri Ketunen and Estonian student Oskar Lorits.  They were working on a Livonian dictionary.  Another resident of Lūžņa was the first Livonian artist, Jānis Belte (1893-1946).  The "Dēliņi" fisherman's homestead has been transferred to the Latvian Ethnographic Open-Air Museum and can be seen there.

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The largest town in the region dates back to the 19th century, when three local fishing villages – Neibāde, Pēterupe and Katrīnbāde – became a popular location for leisure and swimming.  This led to the construction of many summer homes, and the development of the spa was facilitated by the opening of a rail line between Rīga and Saulkrasti in 1905.  New spas and restaurants were opened, and the spa infrastructure was developed.  During the summer there were various entertainments, including balls and concerts featuring orchestras from Rīga.  Also facilitating the development of the spa was a road and railroad line between Rīga and Saulkrasti that were installed during the 1930s.  During the Soviet occupation, leisure homes, sanatoriums and new summer homes were built in Saulkrasti, which was given the status of a city.  Today Saulkrasti is attractive because of its white sand beach, as well as various annual events, the Saulriets trail, the White Dune, the unique bicycle museum, Sea Park, the “Centrs” swimming facility, Sun Square, etc.

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Ģipka is a village that once was the site of the first maritime school in Kurzeme.  It was opened in 1869, just a few years after a similar school in Ainaži.  This was a Category 2 maritime school, which trained helmsmen for long-distance trips and captains for short-distance trips.  The school was moved to Mazirbe in 1894.  Before the maritime school, the building housed a different kind of school, and a second floor was added in 1867 specifically for the maritime school.  Today this is a residential building.  During 28 years, the school trained more than 200 professional sailors, and it was of great importance in facilitating ship building in shoreline Liv villages. (Source: Roja TIC)

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is the second oldest navigation structure in Latvia and the only one that is five kilometres from the shore, at the upper edge of the ancient Lake Baltic Ice.  Since 2000 the lighthouse has not served its initial purpose, and now it is the home to the Nature Education Centre "Slītere" of the Slītere National Park.  The centre offers exhibitions about lighthouses in Latvia and the history of the Baltic Sea.  From the upper floor (102 m above sea level) one can see the coast of Saaremaa (approximately 33 km away).  Alongside the lighthouse is the 1.2 km Šlītere nature trail. 

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It is the bicycle collection of father and son Jānis and Guntis Seregins, which is the only collection of antique bicycles in Latvia. They have been collecting cycles since 1977 when they joined the Antique Automobile Club and became fascinated with Latvia’s cycling traditions. The collection’s core is formed from technically unusual bicycles. In total, the museum has approximately 70 Latvian-made and used bicycles. Besides bicycles there are many other pieces of cycling ephemera relating to sport, cycle clubs and bicycle production. The museum has an extensive collection of bicycle brands, bringing together 1000 badges from all over the world. Guided excursions available.

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The owner offers groups of various sizes a chance to go to the sea in a fisherman’s boat and to watch shoreline fishing, as well. The lamprey eel weirs that are on the Svētupe River differ from those on the Salaca River in terms of their structure and the fishing principles. During the season, the owner prepares tasty smoked lamprey eels.

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The first mention of Pēterupe Rectory goes back to the late 17th century. The Manor Park and the buildings have partially survived to the present day, including a linden alley at the end of Smilšu Street, planted by the pastor Jānis Neilands in 1879 and the grand oak planted by Johann Wilhelm Knierim in 1869. After the fire of 1908, the Rectory was restored and partially rebuilt. In Soviet times, the property was removed from the parish and the house was named “Līgotnes”. During German times the Rectory was occupied by legionnaires. After the war, the building of the Rectory was turned into a hospital, then into a secondary school and later it was transformed into a block of flats for teachers. Now the building again belongs to the parish and it is inhabited by a priest of the parish and his family. 

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The first building of the church was built in 1641. The fourth building of the church was only built in 1856 – during the times of Pastor Johann Wilhelm Knierim. Its altar painting – The Crucified Christ (Golgotha) was painted in 1856 by Jozeps Millers, who was influenced by the altar piece in Munich Louis Church created by his teacher Peter Cornelius. An epitaph of Baroness Auguste Amalija von Pistohlkros, the sister of the owner of Bīriņi Manor and the patroness of the church, was immured in the memorial wall. Construction of the tower was completed on 11 June 1856, as evidenced by a memorial plaque on the wall of the church with an inscription “Erbaut von August Pistolkors 1856”. The church was consecrated in 1864. And a year later an organ by Martin Company with 8 registers, which was extended to 14 registers in 1903, was installed in the church. Unfortunately, the organ was destroyed in WW2. Saulkrasti (Pēterupe) Evangelical Lutheran Church survived both World War 2 and the Soviet period. The Soviet era was one of the most difficult times for the church, because many churches in the area were destroyed, pastors were discharged and the congregation fell apart. The Pēterupe congregation remained. As an architectural monument the church was lucky enough to undergo roof repairs of the tower even during Soviet times. Funds were granted by the Chairlady of the Executive Committee Ņina Manzūrova. 

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In 1877, Baron August von Pistohlkors, celebrating the merits of his ancestors in the foundation and development of Neibāde, ordered a monument to be erected in the park. After World War I, in the early 1930s, the monument was accidentally found during the cleaning of the bed of the River Ķīšupe. The monument was renovated by the Neibāde Aid and Improvement Society and officially reopened in 1933. The monument also suffered damage after World War II. Now the monument is restored and located in the park of the open-air stage.

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It is said that Krišjānis Valdemārs began to dream about a port at this location when he was a child, but a so-called protective port was only established in Roja in the early 20th century, with a protective dam 500 metres from the shore that was 213 m long.  The dam gradually disappeared, and the port was shut down in 1933.  Work on straightening the Roja River began in the 1930s, using a French machine to create berms and build rock dams and pile-based breakwaters that were subsequently extended several times.  In 1932, fishermen built a 107 m breakwater.  Reconstruction of the breakwaters was completed in 1972.  The fishing kolkhoz Banga used to be active here, merging shoreline fishermen’s homesteads. (Source: Roja TIC)

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Vannūzis (Bath) – A building of the five-building complex “Kurhaus”. During the times of the Neibāde resort, this small building used to be a bath place. In order for the guests of the resort to be able to take a dip in the sea water even in bad weather, barrels of water were delivered by horses to the bath place.  

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If you have a desire to escape from the urban crowd and noise, to enjoy the sun and the sea, to get a breath of pine forest, to watch lamprey fishing in the river Svētupe to go out for picking up mushrooms, to ride a bicycle or go skiing, to be inspired by the Svetupe flood-time, to feel odour of  fresh and smoked fish then plan your holidays accompanied by) your family and friends and come to the sunset beach – „Vējavas”.

Vējavas is located at the Svētupe`s  fall into the Rīga Gulf,  on the motorway Rīga – Tallinn 90th km, 10 km before Salacgrīva.

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The “Banquet With Fishermen” event in Roja allows guests to examine the work of fishermen and to enjoy the seafood which they produce. Guests will ride out into the sea in fishing boats and then dine together with the fishermen (fish soup cooked on a campfire, rye bread, butter, smoked fish, beer or kvass, and pastries). The fishermen will teach guests local songs and dances, as well as games related to strength and cleverness. The “Otra Puse” restaurant offers meals.

Latvian cuisine: Fresh fish (“The Morning Catch”), Latvian onion soup, porridge, grit sausage, smoked fish, potato pancakes, rye bread dessert, beer, the “Dzimtenīte” beverage, herbal tea, birch juice, apple cider. 

Special foods: “Made in Roja” – fish from the region, “mackerel in in grass,” “cottage cheese tower with fresh strawberry sauce”.

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This is the ancient shore of the Baltic Ice Lake.  We can only imagine the landscape 10,000 years ago, when the Kurzeme peninsula was covered with vegetation reminiscent of a tundra, and waves from the icy lake dashed against the ancient shoreline.  We know that the lake was full of icebergs of various sizes.  Today the cliff is more than 20 km long (some 9 km of it are in the Slītere National Park), and it is as much as 42 m high.  It is the most impressive cliff of its type in all of Latvia.  At the foot of the cliff are the Irve flatlands (the name comes from the Liv 'īrva' or 'īra', both of which refer to deer).  The flatlands are the former bottom of the Baltic Ice Lake.  The Blue Hills are crossed by many small streams and rivers (Pitragupe, Lorumupe, Kaļķupe, Mazupe, etc.).  Their valleys are the basis for a branched and very complicated system of waterways which look particularly impressive when the trees are bare.  In many places the cliffs and valleys display small areas of sandstone from the Narva suite.  These are Latvia's oldest sediment cliffs that can be seen above ground.  Although the Blue Hills are very impressive in scope, there are only a few places where there are important viewing areas (a viewing tower at the Dundaga-Mazirbe road, the view from the Šlītere lighthouse, the view from Mežlīdumi).  The mightiness of the ancient shoreline can truly be enjoyed from the Cirste-Mazirbe road, the Cirste-Riepaldi road, Mežlīdumi and the Vīdala-Melnsils road).  It is worth visiting the area in the springtime, when the slopes of the Blue Hills seem to be sinking under the fresh greenery.

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A memorial to Finnish soldiers in Klapkalnciems – five such soldiers from World War I are buried here. The memorial was first installed in 1929, but it was destroyed by the Soviet authorities. It was recreated in May 2004. The Lapmežciems Museum features photographs and more information about the Finnish soldiers.
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The museum was established in 1954 and features the traditions of Latvian and Livonian fishermen, sailors and farmers and their lives and residences.  There are fishermen’s homesteads with net huts, smokehouses, granaries, etc.  There is a collection of fishing boats and the largest assemblage of anchors in the Baltic States (more than 100 anchors, the heaviest one weighing 22 tonnes).  The windmill was transported from the Užava Parish.  The 19th century Smiltnieki home features authentic household objects.  The newest thing at the museum is the Lielirbe Baptist Prayer House, which is nearly 100 years old.  A narrow-gauge railroad runs down the 1.3 km Mountain line from May 1 to October 31 every year, and at its end is its turntable.  The building of the museum was designed on the basis of the Mazirbe train station.  The museum is in the Jūrmala park, with playgrounds for children and the Anchor trail.

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On the right bank of the River Pēterupe is one of the historical areas of Saulkrasti – Pēterupe Village. It is believed that the village began to form around a chapel during the so-called Swedish or Catholic times. The chapel was named after the Apostle St. Peter, and therefore the river and the village also carries his name. Pēterupe Village can be considered the oldest village in the Saulkrasti region. The oldest witnesses of the origin of Pēterupe Village are: Rectory, Pēterupe Evangelical Lutheran Church, Outpatient Clinic and the wooden buildings in the old village centre.

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During the latter half of the 19th century, one of the largest ship building facilities was located here between the Dzeņi and Lielkalni homesteads.  It was known as the Ķirbiži and then the Vitrupe shipyard, though nothing remains of it.  28 ships were built here between the 1860s and 1929.

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This is the most distinct cape in Latvia, with the waves of the Baltic Sea and the Bay of Rīga coming together.  During storms, the waves can be as much as 7 metres high.  The cape is an underwater shoal that stretches to the Kolka lighthouse, which is 5 km away.  It is on an artificial island that was created between 1872 and 1875.  When the island became stable, the 21 m lighthouse was installed in 1883.  Manufactured in St Petersburg, the lighthouse became operational on July 1, 1884.  Today the island contains the building for the supervisor of the lighthouse, several ancillary buildings and an impressive fog bell.  A monument to men lost at sea that was sculpted by Ģirts Burvis is on Cape Kolka, as is a wrecked wooden ship, presumably from the 19th century.  There is also a rock that is known as the “heart of Europe,” because the Latvian folklorist Krišjānis Valdemārs believed that the cape was the centre of Europe.  There are stands with information about Valdemārs, and the Latvian Border Guard uses facilities that were once in the hands of the Soviet Coast Guard.  Cape Kolka is an important place for migrating birds during the season, and it has a visitor centre and a summer café.  There are unusual pines on the beach that were washed onto it during storms.  Under the water around the cape is the largest ship graveyard in the Baltic Sea.  It is a dangerous place for swimmers because of changes in the flow of water and shifting sands.  At the end of the cape are the ruins of an old lighthouse that was built in the 18th century and lost during the latter half of the 19th century.

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This may be an ancient cult object, and today it is a little hill in the dunes that is a bit larger than other local hills.  It is said that a church once sank into the dune.  This tale suggests that there was a Christian or pagan prayer place here at one time. (Source: Roja TIC)

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This is a local fish processing plant that offers fantastic products.  The extensive and high-quality assortment of products has won a stable place in Latvia’s market, offering marinated fish, fish in gelatine, fish salad, and frozen fish and fish filets. (Source: Roja TIC)

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The craftswoman uses clay, rocks and other materials to produce dishware and various interior design objects, finishing them in an open kiln. Visitors can take an informational tour, watch the craftswoman at work, and sit down to produce their own cups. Guests are welcome to attend the opening of the kiln.

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A school that was moved from Žocene was here during the 1850s, and it is alongside the Ģipka church.  In 1938, a company from Dundaga opened a shop here to sell goods of basic necessity. (Source: Roja TIC)

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The cosy land road along the sea is 1 km long, and it offers a look at the wonderful aspects of the village.  To the right are rocks from the sea, as well as miniature flower gardens on the seashore with tempting benches and overturned boats.  On the side of the shore is the Kaltene library, which is more than 100 years ago.  It was initially a summer home for Baron Nolken, and it was built in 1899.  Later it was rebuilt several times and took on new roles.  An elementary school was installed here in 1926, after which it became a club and then, in 1992, a primary school once again.  The path runs along beautiful seashore homesteads, among which one can find the former homes of old fishermen and ship builders such as Burliņi.  At one time, the Žulnieki portage at Smilgas was the site of  the kiln of blacksmith Pēteris Valdemārs.  He was the main blacksmith for ships between Kaltene and Upesgrīve. (Source: Roja TIC)

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The roots of Saulkrasti Secondary School reach back to Pabaži, to 1912, when a young teacher – Olga Veicmane (after marriage: Cīrule) arrived from Riga to teach the sea captain Reisons’ daughter. Soon many other tutor-seekers joined her and in autumn of 1912 a school was established in Pabaži. The school had a good reputation, and pupils came from the entire surrounding area. In January of 1913, the school was moved to more spacious premises at 20 Rīgas Street. 
During World War I the school was ruined and its furniture and equipment were dragged away. In 1918 the school was reopened, giving an opportunity for children to enjoy many interesting and captivating activities such as choir singing, theatre group and a group of new writers. The headmaster of the school Olga Cīrule became the soul of local social life. By 1933, the number of pupils had outgrown the size of the school. Therefore in 1933, the school was moved to 3 Raiņa Street – to the premises of the former outpatient clinic. The school was named Pēterupe Primary School. In 1950, the school became Saulkrasti Secondary School and at the end of 1956 the school obtained a new and beautiful building at 6 Smilšu Street. 

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This is a beautiful farm that is friendly to the environment and has some 300 hives of bees. There is a shop along with a tasting hall where you can enjoy honey made of various flowers, pollen (including pollen in honey), propolis (also in honey) bee bread, wax and souvenirs. Taste beekeeping products (including honey wine) and take a tour of the farm, as well.

This farm uses traditional hives to extract honey, and it offers a look at hives that were used in the past. The owners are happy to talk about the development of beekeeping in Latvia and their experience in this regard.

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Jurmala town (the second largest in Latvia) was founded in 1959, by combining Kemeri and Sloka towns in the Riga city Jurmala district. It stretches 32 km along the coastal line of Gulf of Riga. Jurmala resort once was one of the most important objects of this type in the Northern Europe. This was facilitated by the development of local and interstate transport and traffic (coaches, steamers, train). The first guests was accommodated in Dubulti, where in 1834 the first hotel was built, but in 1847 - The first wellness centre. In the 19th the first medical institution launched. Starting from 1834 the rapid construction of summer cottages began. Development of the resort was ended by the World War I. After the war the number of resort vacationers boomed from 12 thousand (in 1920) to 32 thousand (in 1935). Kemeri resort developed along with Jurmala, which received a massive of vacationers' amount during the Soviet period.
Today, Jurmala is a popular venue of concerts, festivals, exhibitions, sports competitions, and other public events.

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Laimonis and Ilga Veidemanis lived in Roja 20 or 30 years ago.  They were deaf and loved to produce models of sailing ships of various sizes.  This was based on a dream about the big ships of their ancestors and the wide seas upon which the couple could not sail.  The models are very precise, designed with much care and love.  The couple never learned the secrets of ship models, but their collection has been inherited by Laimonis’ granddaughter, who wants to display the wonderful collection and her grandfather’s careful work to the public.  The hostess welcomes visitors and tells her story about how the models were produced. (Source: Roja TIC)

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The Castle of the Livonian Order in Ventspils was first listed in documents in the late 13th century, and despite damaging wars, it has maintained its essence as a castle to this very day and only with minimal changes. The castle is also known as the oldest Medieval fortress in Latvia. Today it is home to a modern museum.

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was first recorded in documents in 1582.  The shallow water around the village contains many sunken ships.  In 1826, Pitrags had 11 farms and 190 residents.  A saloon was opened in the mid-19th century.  In 1937, the village had 12 old farms and 38 fishing operations (mostly new farms).  There were several fish processing plants in the village.  One of the local residents was the distinguished Livonian language storyteller Marija Šaltjāre (Bertholde, 1860-1930).  She shared more than 200 fairy tales and legends, more than 90 songs and games, etc.  The Pitrags Baptist Prayer House was built in 1902.  It was burned down during World War I, rebuilt in 1925, and renovated in the late 20th century.  The Krogi homestead in the centre of Pitrags has a collection of 27 old types of Livonian coastline fencing.  The owner also offers a chance to help with the smoking of fish and then to taste the resulting product.

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This pile of big rocks stands around 9 m high and is some kind of monument to Krišjānis Barons and his achievements on behalf of the Latvian people.  His parents lived at the Valpene Estate, and the rocks contain engraved names of lost homesteads from the region.  Their direction in the pyramid indicates where the homesteads used to be.  The idea for the rocks came from Imants Ziedonis, and the pyramid was built by the sculptor Vilnis Titāns.

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Holiday House "In Pitrags by Andris" is near Kolka and Mazirbe, in the small fishermen village Pitrags. Holiday house are with kitchen, bathroom, 1 double bed, 1 bunk bed on the first floor and 2 single beds on the upper floor. Both holiday lodge and camping area situated in a quiet forest, undisturbed atmosphere from the rest of the neighborhood, only about 800 m from the sea coast. Camping area can accommodate about 50 tents and 3 trailers. There is also a chance to see the variety of ways the ancient fence in one place, as well as a walk along the 1 km long forest path. 
Owners are also doing smoked fishes according the old fishermen traditions, offer the fish tasting for individuals and groups.

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This village appears in historical documents from 1310.  A census in 1582 and 1583 recorded eight farms in the village, while a 1731 census conducted by the Dundaga Estate found only three.  In 1826, each farm had 16 or 17 people, with some 60 in total.  A census in 1935 showed that all 49 Livonians in Saunags spoke the Lithuanian language, but only 11 of them spoke the language at home.  There was a store that was owned by Kārlis Tilmanis, who also owned a factory where sprats were salted.  Also born in Saunags was the seafaring captain Arvīds Ludeviks (1912-1996).  In May 1945, he captained a tugboat, the Rota, in an attempt to bring Latvian refugees to Sweden.  The ship was detained, and the captain was sent to Siberia.  Another seafaring captain from Saunags was Visvaldis Feldmanis (1938-2017).

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1.2 km to the south of the centre of Ģipka and on the side of the Jūrmala-Kolka road (P131), this church makes it hard to believe that the rock church was built very recently – after 1992, because it was burned down during the Soviet occupation in 1979.  Ironically, the Dundaga forestry fire safety post was housed in the steeple of the church after World War II.  The ornate altar and organ were destroyed in the fire, but the altar painting, “Christ on the Cross,” was saved.  The church is now once again open for business.

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This little tram offers a great opportunity to return to history, when small trams were found all over Latvia.  Until the 1960s, there was a narrow-gauge railroad that linked shoreline fishing villages along the shores of Northern Kurzeme.  Only a few remnants of the old tracks can still be found in nature, and there are only a few train stations or parts thereof.  Visitors to the Ventspils Open Air Museum can take the 1.4 km Circle Line or the 3 km Mountain Line.  The locomotive was built in Germany in 1916, and the museum features a station building with all of its elements.

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The Kolka group of the Liv Association (est. 1989) established the Liv Centre in 1993, and it features a collection of Liv ethnographic objects.  The centre hosts exhibitions and various thematic events.  The work of the centre is based mostly on volunteers, and it is mostly open during the tourism season.

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The story of this bakery started more than 25 years ago, near Limbaži, when craftsman Alberts Blumbergs’ knowledge and experience was put into practice and very delicious rye bread was made. Every loaf of bread is handmade. We also offer tours in the bakery and tasting.

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The saloon is at the edge of the Murjāņi-Limbaži road (P9) and alongside the Igate Castle. It is built on the foundations of a former windmill, and the wheel of the mill has been preserved. The old watermill is still hard at work and is used to mill grain for traditional porridge and buns. The saloon works with local farmers.

Latvian cuisine: Mushroom soup, barley porridge with meat, barley buns, grit sausage with lingonberry sauce, crepes with jam, potato pancakes, fried plaice or pike, stacked rye bread.

Special foods: Sautéed rabbit, stuffed filet of turkey.

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The workshop offers a look at lanterns, candelabras, hinges, fireplace tools, stair railings and gates that have been manufactured there, as well as several exhibits from the 18th century. You can produce your own nail, and the blacksmith will also “test” young couples. He also accepts orders for products.

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This is a pergola that is owned by Līga Reitere, who offers medicinal grasses and saunas for adults and children.  She will show you how to tie together sauna switches, fire up the oven in the sauna and create steam inside it.  You can also learn how wild plants can be used for tasty teas or salads, as well as to weave lovely crowns or grass carpets.  Master classes, creative activities, educational seminars, evening sessions and sauna sessions are all available, with Līga also being well informed about local linguistic issues and traditions.

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The “Strand” Complex – it was the largest and most luxurious recreational complex in Neibāde. It consisted of three buildings, a dance pavilion and a park. Only one building of the hotel, the same as what was once Saulkrasti outpatient clinic at 17 Ainažu Street, has survived until nowadays.

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This is a very interesting monument to the history of fishing in the region.  These areas had docks and areas where fishermen built huts to store their nets and other inventory.  The areas also had a social role – men came together to discuss work that had to be done, while women and children wove nets.  The huts at Bigauņciems were eventually washed into the sea, and the areas at Ragaciems have been partly destroyed.  The ones at Lapmežciems are the ones which are best preserved.  One of the net huts has been restored, but the others are in very poor condition, indeed.  That may be why you should focus on these huts as you walk along the beach.  Make sure that you take some pictures of this historic location.

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Kemeri (Kemmer) are mentioned in the literature sources for the first time in 1561. In the second half of the 18th century and in the beginning of the 19th century the curative properties of Kemeri sulphur spring waters and swamp mud are well known, therefore here representatives of the highest Kurzeme social circles arrive for treatment. The local foresters welcome the guests. During this time the first mud baths are organised. For some time the development of Jurmala and Kemeri beach is terminated by the Fatherland War of 1812. Two decades later – from 1833 until 1835 the benefits of Kemeri were enjoyed by General Governor of the Baltics Graf K. M. Palen, who addresses the Tsar of Russia Nicholas I for supporting further development of the health resort. Plead is supported and in 1836 Tsar allocates 700 ha of state land and grants 100 000 roubles for the construction of sanatorium and paving of the road from Kemeri till Sloka-Tukums high-way. Two years later (in 1938) the first state bath institution is opened. This is also considered the year of founding the health resort. In several stages the formation of Kemeri Landscape Park is begun, which is an important part of the health resort. In the middle and second half of the 19th century further development of the health resort is promoted by steamboat, as well as railroad traffic that are opened in 1877 from Riga till Tukums. In 1912 direct railroad line Kemeri-Moscow is opened. Early before World War I the number of patients reaches 8300 per year. The 1st battlefront of World War I is held in Kemeri swamp for several years and the health resort is significantly destroyed. Despite this fact after the war it develops rapidly and Kemeri becomes a beloved recreation place for the residents of Riga and one of the most modern health resorts in Europe. In 1924 a new bath institution with mud-baths is built in Kemeri, which at the time is one of the most modern in Europe, but in 1936 State President Kārlis Ulmanis opens one of the most prominent buildings of the first independent state of Latvia period – hotel "Ķemeri". Also after World War II – during the Soviet times the health resort is significantly expanded and almost 10 sanatoriums are established within its territory, in which about 100 doctors are employed. In 1971 Kemeri is awarded the status of All-Union health resort. From 1975 until 1985 the largest of sanatoriums is constructed in Kemeri – Līva (initially – Latvija), which has two blocks of eleven storeys. Up to 1200 patients at the same time could receive treatment at Līva, but within a year – up to 140 000 patients. The sanatorium is closed in the beginning of the 90ies of the 20th century as unprofitable. Up to 1994 five sanatoriums operate in Kemeri: "Čaika", "Daugava", "Dzimtene", "Ķemeri" and "Līva" (Latvija) and resort policlinic "Ķemeri". The latter period may be considered the declining fame period of Kemeri as a large-scale health resort.

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In the Berzini homestead they bake exceptionally tasty wheat and rye bread in accordance with the old folk recipes. The taste and smell is the result of baking bread in a special oven which is more than 70 years old. It is possible to order bread, or, having booked a visit beforehand,  to make and bake your own bread loaf. The owners will teach you bread baking traditions and use recipes from their ancestors to bake loaves in a true bread oven.

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It is believed that at the Kezberkalnins of Limbazi has been Lemisele castle of Metsepole Liv district. It is also found in the reports that merchants travelled to this place from the sea by Svētupe and Dunezers until the 16th century. In 1223 Bishop Albert built a stone castle in Limbazi. Like Valmiera, Limbazi became the member of Hanseatic League. At the beginning of 16th century it economic role declined significantly since Svētupe and Dunezers became unusable for shipping. Between the 16th and 18th centuries, the town and its people suffered from wars, diseases and fires. As a result, the population reached its utmost fall - eight people. In the turn of 19th and 20th century and in the beginning of 20th century the economic life of the town was renewed.

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Dzirnupes is a traditional Vidzeme farm where visitors feel the true romance of Latvia’s countryside. This is an excellent leisure venue for couples or families with children. Guests are accommodated in a granary that was built in 1924 and is now a romantic building with a sauna. The owner manufactures drums from tree stumps and is prepared to teach visitors who to forge a nail at the farm’s smithy, as well as to use a bow and arrow. The lady of the house will teach future or young wives to produce programmes that are in line with Latvian traditions in terms of learning skills and knowledge that are necessary for Latvian wives.

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One of the first homes in Kolka, 1.2 km from Kolkasrags, the furthest northern point of Courland separating the Baltic Sea from the Gulf of Riga.

The owner of the farm demonstrates the way in which the traditional Northern Kurzeme dessert that is a carrot bun and is known as a "sklandrausis" is prepared. Hikers can take a tour to see the industrial history of Kolka, complete with theatrical elements and tasting of Latvia’s best sprats.

Latvian cuisine: Porridge with fried onions and meat, kefir, herbal teas.

Special foods: Carrot buns.

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Roman Catholic Church of Divine Grace – On 19 April 1998, the so-called “White Sunday” or the Day of Divine Grace, Saulkrasti Roman Catholic Church of Divine Grace was consecrated. The building is 24 m long and its tower is 16 m high. The 300-seat church was designed by the architect Jānis Šrēders. The image of Christ on the altarpiece was derived from the vision of the saint, Sister Faustina, of 22 February 1931 in a monastery in Poland. The altarpiece was created by the artist Ēriks Pudzēns. 14 paintings on the walls of the church depict Christ’s path of suffering from conviction to resurrection. The altar is built of ash. On 2 August 1998, a 7.38 m tall cross was consecrated by Saulkrasti Roman Catholic Church of Divine Grace. At night this cross is illuminated. The cross is similar to the cross of Golgotha in Jerusalem where Jesus Christ was crucified.

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This site has a commemorative stone which speaks to Krišjānis Valdemārs’ achievements in the development of the Latvian state.  This used to be the location of the Roja or Lubezere maritime school, and the home for teachers is still there.  A private medical practice is in the building right now.  The maritime school existed from 1873 to 1915 and was wrecked during World War I.  The school trained helmsmen for short-distance trips.  Tuition was free, and classes were taught in Latvian.  Latvian sailors were known in Russia and abroad, including the Americas.  They were respected for their serious approach to their work, their honesty and their loyalty. (Source: Roja TIC)

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In 1888, the building, provided for a doctor’s needs, was donated by Baron Alexander Alexei von Pistohlkors to the parish of Pēterupe Lutheran Church. Along with the building, Baron Pistohlkors also donated 6 hectares of land and 10 000 roubles for the doctor’s use. Arvēds von Engelhards became the first medical doctor in Pēterupe. In 1890, the first pharmacy was opened in one room of the clinic, serving people from a wide area; it remained in the building until 1895. This outpatient clinic was the very first stone building in Saulkrasti, the first health authority in a wide area, as well as the first pharmacy. Through its entire lifetime, the house was maintained from voluntary donations – at first by Alexander Alexei von Pistohlkors, then by churchgoers of Pēterupe Parish – therefore by the money of the villagers.
This house also played a role as the place of establishment of the Saulkrasti development society, which was actively supported by many celebrities such as the opera singer Herberts Ozolītis, actresses Tija Banga, Mirdza Šmithene, Lilija Štengele and Malda Gruzevska, composer Alfrēds Kalniņs and many other cultural professionals, artists and writers of that time, who used to spend summers in Saulkrasti. In 1933, the parish converted the outpatient clinic for the needs of a school.
Saulkrasti Primary School was transferred to the building of the former outpatient clinic.

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The Laumas farm offers you a chance to be a beekeeper, watching the lives of bees in hives (while wearing a beekeeper’s suit), touring a bee trail and climbing a tree with the help of a truss. You can make wax candles and purchase beekeeping products such as honey, bee pollen, etc. A café is open during the summer, and there are areas of picnics.

Latvian cuisine: Bean and dumpling soup, pancakes with jam, homemade lemonade, herbal teas.

Special foods: Porridge a la Fairies.

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Back when the Baltic Sea was part of the ancient Littorina Sea, the coastline emerged as a small and shallow shore that was formed 4,500 to 5,000 years ago.  The coastline has little rocks and gravel that have preserved typical examples of fauna from the Littorina Sea.  The ancient cliff is best seen at the Dobeļi homestead in Kaltene.  This is one of a few parts of the shore of the Bay of Rīga where there was an abrasion coastline during the era of the Littorina Sea.  The shallow bay is popular among birds which feed and rest here during migrations. (Source: Roja TIC)

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Reinis Kaudzīte, co-author of the first Latvian novel “Times of the Land-Surveyors” (“Mērnieku laiki”) stayed in Pēterupe Village from 1913. 
In 1913 R. Kaudzīte bought a small property (currently No. 17 School Street), where he spent the last years of his life along with the lady of the house Karlīna Damroze. After the death of R. Kaudzīte, Karlīne – the well-known and respected midwife – continued to run the household. During Soviet times, the house was converted into a residential building. The neighbouring garden-house also acquired the status of a one-room flat, which in 11 August 1991 was turned into the Public Museum of Saulkrasti History. In 2008 the basic idea of the museum was changed and the house underwent redecoration. Now the museum is dedicated to the life of Reinis Kaudzīte in Pēterupe. The exhibition consists of furniture, crockery, household items, tools, photographs and other items of the early 20th century contributed by Saulkrasti residents. 
“Neighbour’s bench” and a signpost with references to places where the writer once travelled to are located in the garden by the building.

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The restored mansion of the Dunte Estate is now a museum featuring the adventures and life of the legendary king of lies, Baron Munchhausen.  The first floor is devoted to the barn and his stories, while the second floor has a collection of wax models of people who are distinguished in terms of Latvia’s history.  Also there is the largest collection of beer mugs in Latvia.  There are three circular trails in the forest with wooden sculptures.  The longest one leads to the sea.  A wooden model of a ship is interesting to children.

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Usi
Self-catering cottage

The proximity of Cape Kolka, the air with its redolent scent of the sea and the pine trees, and a unique identity – these are the characteristics of Kolka, and the Ūši farm has fully absorbed them.  Guests have a separate apartment in a country house with a shower and WC.

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The former name of the house was “Forstei” (Forester’s House). It was built using logs of the old Bīriņi Castle. The first owner of the building was Alexander Alexei von Pistohlkors, the baron of Bīriņi Manor. It used to be a house of the manor’s chief forester Pauls Moltrehts. The building served as the chief forester’s work place and residence, as well as the Manor’s hunting base. The building was rebuilt several times. It obtained its current appearance and also the symbolic deer antlers in 1891. During the times of the Independent State of Latvia the house obtained a Latvian name – “Meža māja” or “Forest House”. Ownership of the house has repeatedly changed. In the 1930s, the house became a recreation place for cultural professionals and artists. In 1937, the composer Alfrēds Kalniņš spent the summer in the house working on an interpretation of the score for the second staging of the first Latvian opera “Baņuta”. During the post-war period – from 1945 to 1956 – the building housed Saulkrasti Village Council, and during the times of Saulkrasti District it was the location of the People’s Education Department. Later the children’s sanatorium “Ugunskurs” was transferred from Jūrmala to this building and was renamed “Saulkrasti Children’s sanatorium”. Now the building is privately owned.

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This is one of the most interesting protected territories in the city of Rīga, and its aim is to protect coastline biotopes – dune and coastal meadows and the birds and plants which are found there (among them, 29% of the species of orchids). There is a marked information trail with a bird-watching tower. This is the only outdoor viewing tower in Latvia that has been adapted for the needs of people in wheelchairs.
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The museum at Valdemāra Street 47 was opened in 1969 in the building of the maritime school that was opened in 1864 at the suggestion of Krišjānis Valdemārs.  The school trained more than 1,000 sea captains and helmsmen.  The exhibition at the museum relates to the operations of the school, as well as the building of sailing ships on the Vidzeme shoreline during the latter half of the 19th century and the early part of the 20th century.  There is a collection of anchors, as well as the top of the Ainaži lighthouse, which was once washed away by the sea, but has been restored.

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3 km to the south of the centre of Jūrkalne, near the old (gravelled) road between Liepāja and Jūrkalne, is the place where the three-year Feliksberga Maritime School existed between 1871 and 1902.  The building is long gone, and the memorial has involves an oaken boat with two wooden poles on which old ownership signs have been engraved.

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This is one of the few places in the world where lamprey eels are caught at the industrial level and with a fishing method that has been used for the past 150 years – a weir that stretches across the river and has creels along it. There are three weirs in all on the Salaca River. A local fisherman will teach you about the process and allow you to taste and purchase roast lampreys.

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Construction of the Neibāde resort in 1823, started up hospitality traditions. The park, designed in an English style, was created by the gardener Akerbergs, who was brought from Estonia by Baron August von Pistohlkors. In the 1920s – 1930s the Pēterupe – Neibāde Seashore Aid and Improvement Society looked after the restoration and care of the monument and the park of the resort that was ruined during the war, the appearance of Saulkrasti, the organisation of different events and foundation of the theatre and the choir, led by Olga Cīrule. Saulkrasti open-air stage has always been a place for festivities. 16 July 1933 is a date that deserves special attention as it was on this date that the open-air stage became the place where Neibāde and Pēterupe were renamed Saulkrasti. The open-air stage was repeatedly rebuilt and improved. Both during the Soviet era, as well as later, this was a meeting place for locals on joyful moments, on moments of change and remembrance. The stage was the place of origin of the Popular Front of Latvia (Latvijas Tautas fronte) Saulkrasti branch. Now the stage is a meeting place and holds different events on summer weekends. Each year Saulkrasti town festival concert takes place on this open-air stage.

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SIA "Limbažu Tīne" ir vilnas pārstrādes uzņēmums ar senām mājas tekstila tradīcijām, kas dibināts jau 1914. gadā. Šobrīd uzņēmumā tiek ražota vilnas dzija, austi augstvērtīgi vilnas un linu audumi, segas, parklāji, pledi, galdauti, dvieļi, lakati un citi tekstilizstrādājumi. Limbažu Tīne ražo etnogrāfiskos audumos pēc autentiskajām Baltijas reģiona kultūrvēsturiskā mantojuma paraugiem.  

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Opened on June 21, 2011, at the 51st kilometre of the Tallinn-Riga highway, the MEKE KROGS pub is a typical example of the roadside pubs which used to be built along the sides of roads and near homesteads, castles, mills and windmills. This particular one is located into renovated cattle shed that is more than 100 years old – a lovely log building that is named after the former baron of the local estate, von Mecke. Alongside it is the handsome parish building which was erected in 1907 with red bricks from Tūja.

Latvian cuisine: Sorrel stew with grits, cold soup, pounded beef, mutton and vegetable stew, grits with smoked meat and mushrooms, herring with cottage cheese, bread soup.

Special foods: Porridge with bacon bits and Meke spicy sausages.

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In Limbazi, in the crossroads of Cesu and Dailes streets, there is a monument dedicated to the author of Latvian anthem. The monument was designed by the sculptors Zigrīda Rapa and Juris Rapa.  It was unveiled on May 16, 1998, when Limbaži was celebrating its 775th anniversary.

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The owners are third-generation fishers, and they will be happy to sell you some smoked local fish. Tour groups can take part in active leisure related to cultural aspects of smoking tasty fish (tossing a boot into the sea, stories from fishermen’s wives, a theatrical performance, and the smoking and tasting of fish).

Latvian cuisine: Smoked and dried plaice, hot-smoked eelpout and other fish prepared on the basis of ancient local recipes.

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This is an ancient Liv village, known as Mustanumm is the last village in the south-easterly direction, and during the mid-20th century, just a few Livonians lived there.  Of 307 inhabitants in 1935, only 15 were Livonians.  At the beginning of the 19th century, there were six farms and a lagoon here, but at the end of the century there were 63 farms.  The valley of the Baķupīte River and the sea had remnants of pilings that provided evidence about a Medieval port.  Legends say that the sea robber Trommel had a castle on the left bank of the river during the 14th century.  Sailing ships were once built in the region, as well. Two locations of cultural and historical importance in Melnsils are the ancient cult location that is the Baķi castle hill, and the castle hill of a sea pirate Trommel.

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One of the largest castles in Kurzeme, this building has been preserved in fairly good shape.  Work on its began in the mid-13th century, and it was commissioned by the heads of the Dome Cathedral in Rīga.  In 1434, the estate was bought by the bishop of Kurzeme.  The Maidel and Osten-Sacken dynasties owned it from the 16th to the 20th century.  The Dundaga Castle burned down twice and has been rebuilt many times.  The last reconstruction was in 1905, after the castle was burned down during the revolution.  Of interest on both sides of the castle’s door are stone carvings of a knight and a bishop.  In recent years, the hotel in the castle has been renovated, as has the second floor hallway and a terrace that is popular for weddings.  There are many legends about the castle, including one about a wedding of elves and another about the Green Lady.  Today the building houses the Dundaga School of Music and Art, a hotel, party rooms, the Dundaga Tourism Information Centre and various exhibitions.  It is worth finding a guide to tour the castle.  Groups of tourists can also order tastings of local foods.

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This is one of the most important destinations in Northern Kurzeme, offering a wealth of information about the history of the region and the shoreline, its cultural and historical values, the building of sailing ships, fishing traditions, local residents and their work and achievements.  The museum was opened in 1968, and right now it has permanent exhibitions about Krišjānis Valdemārs, the Roja maritime school and the building of sailing ships in the 19th century.  There is also information about the history of fish processing from the 19th century to the present day, the Liv Shore, and the Soviet contributions toward the development of the coastline.  The museum features three women from Kurzeme from different historical periods – Mildiņa, who is a simple fisherman’s wife, Mrs Pauliņš from the era of sailing ship building, and Anna Petrovna from the Soviet era.  The three women offer attractive information about objects that are not exhibited at the museum, also displaying the naughty sense of humour that people in Kurzeme have. (Source: Roja TIC)

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The biography of Krišjānis Valdemārs tells us that during the summer of 1839, teachers and students from the Lubezere school spent a few days on the coastline in Roja, where Valdemārs would later help to build a maritime school.  The area was breath-taking and unforgettable for the little boy.  “The noble appearance of the sea grabbed the spirit of the young man so powerfully that during those three days, I thought about nothing other than the noble sea, with childish courage that allowed me to prepare a plan for a deeper port in the Roja River so that larger boats and small ships could enter it,” Valdemārs wrote. (Source: Roja TIC)

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A small fishermen’s house preserved in the original style, situated not far from the sea in Berzciems, offers 2 comfortable rooms for peaceful rest, with a fireplace and a small kitchen. The family of the owners through many generations try to preserve old fishermen’s traditions, including those in fish processing and smoke curing. The guests have an opportunity to buy local products – smoked fish from the Engure lake and the Baltic Sea.

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In the 19th century at the seaside of Skulte, a small village formed, which was inhabited by fishermen. The name “Zvejniekciems” (Fishermen’s village) arose from the population's main activity. In 1967 the Skulte part of Zvejniekciems was added to the Saulkrasti township. Nowadays Zvejniekciems is the home of Skulte Port, and the rocky beach of Zvejniekciems is located between the port and Saulkrasti Beach, while the village itself can be proud of the creative heritage left by the architect Marta Staņa (1913–1972).

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was first mentioned in written form in 1582.  A census in 1736 found two farms, Lekši and Žonaki.  A census in 1935 found that there were 106 people in Vaide, including 40 Livonians, 60 Latvians and a few Estonians and Germans.  In 1939, there were 21 homesteads in the village.  Nika Polmanis (1823-1903) was born at the Lāži homestead.  He was the first educated Livonian and lived in the region for all his life.  Livonian poet Alfons Bertholds (1910-1993) wrote a poem about a noble oak tree that grows alongside the homestead.  The vast Berthold family is linked to Žonaki -- Livonian storyteller Marija Šaltjāre, yacht captain Andrejs Bertholds (USA), his son, library scholar Artūrs Benedikts Bertholds (USA), Livonian poet Alfons Bertholds, Livonian language specialists Paulīne Kļaviņa and Viktors Bertholds, Swiss doctor Marsels Bertholds, globally renowned pianist Arturs Ozoliņš (Canada), and Livonian language storyteller and poet Grizelda Kristiņa (1910-2013), who was the last native speaker of Livonian.  The Ozolnieki homestead is also linked to the Bertholds family.  Paulīne Kļaviņa (1918-2001), a specialist in the fields of Livonian traditions and language, and her mother, Livonian storyteller Katrīna Zēberga, both lived there.  Paulīne collected ethnographic objects that can be seen at the Latvian Ethnographic Open Air Museum in the granary of the Livonian Dēliņi farm.  The Purvziedi homestead in Vaide is owned by forest ranger Edgars Hausmanis, who has a collection of forest animal horns and antlers.

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This 1995 sculpture by Oļegs Skarainis is at the corner of Dinsberģa and Talsu streets in Dundaga, near the local dairy.  It is dedicated to the strong men of the town, including former Dundaga resident Arvīds Blūmentāls (1925-2006), who lived in Australia, was a great crocodile hunter (some 10,000 in all), and served as a prototype for Paul Hogan in the famous movie “Crocodile Dundee.” 

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Near the place where the Kilmiņupe River flows into the sea is the legendary Trommel castle hill, which was a Medieval fortification.  It is some 100 m from the Kraujas homestead.  An archaeological dig in 1977 found fragments of bricks and pot-bellied stoves, which suggests that the fortifications date back to the Middle Ages.  The location also is linked to stories about a pirate, Trommel, who buried his loot here.  The holes in the area have been left behind by treasure hunters.  Trommel supposedly robbed ships in the Bay of Rīga from the shores of Kurzeme to Roņu Island.  Many ships docked here in ancient times, waiting for better winds so that they could pass by Cape Kolka.  The pirate made use of this fact, also pillaging property from sunken ships.  It is said that Trommel lived in a stone castle. (Source: Roja TIC)

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The forest around Kaltene features a natural miracle – the rocks of Kaltene, which are also known as the barrier rocks.  The rocks are 2-3 m from the sea and date back to the Ice Age.  The Devil’s rock is the largest one.  It used to be a beautiful pile of rocks that “stretched to the tops of the trees.”  In older maps it is described as being 20 m high.  It had many natural rocks, including some that were completely round, while others resembled plates.  The rock was almost completely destroyed in the 1960s and 1970s, when it was chopped up to build roads.  A fairly small part of the rock survives today, and it is 300 m long and 2 m high.  Scientists believe that these rocks used to be sacred locations, because there are many legends and stories about them.  There is a forest path with wooden pathways, information stands and a small car park there. (Source: Roja TIC)

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Visitors can help to smoke fish, including plaice, bream and garfish, taste the resulting food and listen to stories about seashore fishing traditions. The homestead also features some 20 type of shoreline fencing that are typical of the so-called Liv Shore.

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An ancestral farmstead on the former Labrags estate. Country sauna and good cuisine. Everything is like in the olden days, but one feels right at home.
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A cemetery has been found in this location since 1773, and among those who are buried there is the outstanding Latvian poet Ojārs Vācietis (1933-1983).   A monument commemorating him is here, as is the Carnikava Estate repository that was built in the 18th century.  The gravestone of a lessor of the estate, Falck, is also in the cemetery.

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This lighthouse is in Ovīši, which is an ancient Livonian village. The 38-metre lighthouse on Cape Ovīši was built in 1814 and modernised in 1860, and it is the oldest functioning lighthouse in Latvia today. Visitors will get a great view of the shores of the Baltic Sea and the forests which cover them. The lighthouse also offers an exhibition devoted to the history of lighthouses in Latvia.
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Was mentioned in 1387, where it was called Domesnes.  That was the name until the early 20th century.  A ledger at the Irbe-Ģipka church states that there were four farms in Kolka in 1770 -- Krogi, Ūši, Vecvagari and Kabriki.  In 1844, a school for vergers was established, and Nika Polmanis worked there as a teacher.  Kolka's first school was built in 1881, and Livonian Kārlis Bernšteins (1881-1951) worked there for nearly half a century as a teacher.  The Dundaga riots that began in 1859 were led by Livonian Nika Šūbergs (1833-1884), the son of the owner of the Sārnasti farm.  At the end of the 19th century, there were 392 residents in Kolka, and in 1935, 145 of the 343 residents were Livonians.  During the mid-1980s, 13 Livonians spoke their language freely.  Kolka is the only coastal Livonian village that continued to develop during the frontier regime of the Soviet Union, because it was the centre of a fishing kolkhoz.  The number of residents increased rapidly in the 1950s and 1960s because new homes, a school, a people's centre, a kindergarten and several fish processing factories were built there.  Today Kolka has 700 residents and is the largest village along the Livonian coastline.  The "Līcis-93" fish processing factory is there, and local fishermen and smokers of fish work in the village.  The Kūolka Livonian Centre and the Livonian ensemble Laula operate there, as well.  The Ūši farm offers tastings of Livonian foods.

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The tavern is located in the old log building close to Liepupe Church. There is an old cattle-shed next to the tavern where we make meat and sausage products that you can purchase in the Sudrabņi meat and sausage store. We offer tours and tastings.

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This is one of the oldest Livonian villages, recorded in documents for the first time in 1387.  The old road from the Dundaga Estate to Sīkrags existed in the Middle Ages.  During the 17th century, Sīkrags was one of the most important small ports in Northern Kurzeme, receiving ships from England, Holland and Lubeck that carried coal, grain and other products.  Before World War I, there were five sprat smokehouses in the village, and some 55 fishermen lived there during the 1920s and 1930s.  Among those to have been born in Sīkrags was the Livonian cultural activist Hilda Grīva (Cerbaha, 1910-1984), seafaring captain Kārlis Anbanks (1884-1937), Baptist preacher Kārlis Lāceklis (1904-1970), linguist and tradition specialist Pēteris Dambergs (1909-1987), and graphic artist Baiba Damberga (b 1957).  Today the village is a cultural monument of national importance.  It is crossed by a bike route, with a commemorative stone where the narrow-gauge railroad station once stood.  Sīkrags, like neighbouring villages, is in the Slītere National Park.

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There are both sandy beaches with a good infrastructure and a rock beach in Roja.  The rocky beach leads to a huge rock that is 2 m high and 12.5 m in diameter.  The coastline is lovely with its scattered stones and its unhurried rhythm of time.  At the place where the Silupīte River flows into the sea there are remnants of ancient wooden boats and iron nails.  In 1939, Roja became the starting point for a closed zone, because the Soviet army and navy were sited there until 1993.  The dunes at Krasta Street feature Soviet heritage, including a large cement wall from which border guards used to monitor the sea and catch those who violated the border.  Behind the dunes was a base for border guards with everything they needed.  Roja housed a Border Guard post and an air defence radio locator. (Source: Roja TIC)

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Construction on the lighthouse was initially completed in 1879. The structure suffered damage during both world wars and was restored several times. The structure is 19 metres high and stands 46.5 metres above the wavy sea. Here you will find one of the loveliest views of the shores of the Baltic Sea.
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The museum is in the mansion of the Dole Estate, which was built in 1898 for the Loeuwis von Menar dynasty.  The collection presents Daugava as an important water route, with the apparel of Baltic and Liv tribes, everyday objects, etc.  Outside the movement is equipment to catch lampreys and a reconstructed weir to catch salmon.  Alongside is a 17th century cannon from the Duchy of Courland that was found in the Misa River and was cast in Baldone.  Nearby are four cannons from the Russian tsar’s army.  Those were found on a building lot in Salaspils in 2007.

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You will feel the beauty, power and energy of nature here, ensuring harmony with nature and a good sense of the energy of rocks, plants, Latvian plants and underground streams.  Rocks here decorate the garden, which offers a good view of the sea and a cascade of waterfalls that are delightful in the spring and the fall.  During the summer, it is a rock river.  The site is one km to the north of the bus stop in Tūja and has 28 types of coniferous trees, 14 decorative shrubs, 13 kinds of rhododendrons, and winter plants.  The interesting collection of stones may mean that there is an energy field, and the garden is quite esoteric.  The rocky seashore of Vidzeme is nearby, and the garden has received many prizes from the Salacgrīva Administrative District and Latvia as such.

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In Ošvalki, which is between Jūrkalne and Sārnate, there is a commemorative sign, “Sail of Hope,” which commemorates Latvians who sought to cross the Baltic Sea to Sweden during the latter period of World War II in 1944 and 1945.  The sign is in the dunes between the road and the sea.

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On 14 June 1991, this sign sculpted by Zezostrs Ķēde in memory of the repressions of 1941 and 1949 was unveiled in the garden of Pēterupe Church.

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The River Ķīšupe (length – 31 km) begins its journey in the marshlands of Lēdurga Parish. As the river reaches the seashore, its bed and the location of its mouth often changes. One of the tributaries of the Ķīšupe carries a rather interesting name – Pupaļurga. The name of the River Ķīšupe probably comes from the name of a man and his house. In the 17th century a man named Ķīsis (in English: ruffe) used to live by the river. 

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Lamprey catching and processing traditions started long ago in Carnikava, in the place where the River Gauja enters the sea. On the tour you can find out about lamprey and their preparation methods, as well as enjoy them grilled, jellied or in the form of lamprey sushi.

Latvian cuisine: Grilled lamprey, jellied lamprey, lamprey sandwiches.

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The estate has undergone extensive restoration. Today it houses an exquisite hotel and restaurant and has recovered its antique beauty and charm, old-fashioned rural romanticism. Rooms are decorated with beautiful wood stoves and fireplaces. Spa procedures combine the best from around the world with the richness of Latvian countryside. Restaurant offers true gourmet meals. 
Facilities: “Wine and Dine” restaurant, wine cellar, black bread master classes, spa programmes.