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Helsinki is the capital of Finland and the biggest city in Finland. It offers a lot to see as it is seaside city surrounded by islands but city itself is full of wonderful parks. This city has everything to attract all kinds of people - from architecture and culture to nature and even has wide range of places where to enjoy night-time Helsinki.

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Valdemārpils is a small and quiet town along the shore of Lake Sasmaka.  A village of craftsmen and merchants was established on the land of the Sasmaka Estate in the 17th century.  There were quite a few Jewish merchants and craftsmen in towns in Kurzeme during the mid-19th century, and Sasmaka was known as their capital city.  The city was named Valdemārpils in 1926.  Its historical 19th century centre is a monument to urban construction.  The town has a Lutheran church, an Orthodox church, a former synagogue, a monument to Krišjānis Valdemārs, and an outstanding linden tree.

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Ein ehemaliges Fischerdorf am Ufer des Kurischen Haffs. Aufgrund der Wanderdünen hat seinen Standort mehrmals seit dem Anfang des 19.Jh. geändert. Holzbebauung mit einheitlichem Stil und Traditionen.

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is seen as the newest village along the Livonian coastline.  It was established during the 17th century.  Košrags had 78 residents in 1826.  The first reading school for Livonian children in the Dundaga seashore villages was opened at the Žoki homestead in 1832.  One of the teachers was Nika Polmanis, who was the first Livonian to have completed a professional education.  He also translated the Gospel of Matthew into the Eastern Livonian dialect.  Košrags had a windmill, water mill and boat building facility.  During the spring, job seekers from Saaremaa stopped here.  A port was installed in 1932, and a breakwater to collect sea fertiliser followed in 1938.  During the 1930s, Košrags was regularly visited by Finnish and Estonian linguists to study the folklore of the Livonians.  The Norpiedagi homestead was built by Livonian activist Didriķis Volganskis (1884-1968).  His son, Livonian cultural worker and pastor (in Finland) Edgars Vālgamā (Volganskis, 1912-2003) was born there.  He translated the Andrejs Pumpurs epic "Lāčplēsis" into Finnish.  Košrags today is a cultural monument of national importance.

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Although out of 104 village houses 97 were destroyed during World War I, at the end of the 30ies of the 20th century Lapmezciems "recovered" fast, and one of the most powerful coastal fishermen cooperatives in Latvia were operating in it. During the Soviet times here one of the largest fishery collective farms – "Selga" was founded here, the blocks of which can be seen at the mouth of the Siliņupe River. Today Lapmezciems is a popular area for summer cottages, a recreation and bathing place. As an interesting history monument of fishery the sedum of Lapmezciems is available for viewing – it is the former wharf of fishing boats, where fishermen built nest cabins and stored their equipment. Between Pīlādži Street and the left bank of the Siliņupe River in the 3rd and 2nd millennium BC settlement of fishermen and hunters were located, where a memorial stone is erected. This is the most ancient known location populated by humans within the territory of Kemeri National Park. Part of the findings is displayed at Lapmezciems museum, where local history research exposition is formed and materials about Finnish Jeager fights within the territory of Klapkalnciems are gathered.

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Jaunciems has always been a small village, and only a few homes are populated today. Nearby there are leisure locations on the right bank of the Irbe River. Jaunciems is linked to Sīkrags by the former tracks of the narrow-gauge train. There is also a bridge for hikers and bicyclists.

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Dagda is mentioned in the historical sources of 17th century as a trader village. In 1772, Dagda district was included the Pskov province, but in 1802 - Vitebsk province. In 1905 widespread peasant unrest took place here, during which many important architectural monuments were destroyed. Town was not spared also by the two world wars. What's to see for the tourist here? In the centre of Dagda historical buildings - houses, built of red brick - the so-called "Jewish tradesmen houses" are preserved. Dagda is the only place in the Latvia, where every year is celebrated Anne's Day in the town's park!

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The history of Cēsis begins at the Riekstu hill, which is 18 m high and the surrounding area.  There was a wooden castle built by the Vendian tribe that stood there from the 11th to the 13th century.  The hill is in the central part of the castle’s park, and it offers a fine view of the park, a pond and the ruins of the Cēsis Castle.  A long staircase leads to the hill.  The Cēsis Castle was built in the early 13th century as the residence of masters of the Livonian Order, and it was one of the most fortified forts in the Baltic region.  Alongside is the New Cēsis Castle, which was built in 1777 in a place where gate fortifications had been before.  The building houses the Cēsis Museum of History and Art, and an annex contains the Castle Visitor Centre and the Cēsis Tourism Information Centre.  From the tower of the castle, we get a good view of the castle ruins, St John’s Lutheran Church and the northern stretches of the city.  Opposite the new castle is the stable of the Cēsis Castle Estate and a wheelhouse (both from the first half of the 19th century).  Today these house the Cēsis Exhibition Hall.  Other buildings include a granary, a hut for coachmen and an old brewery.  On the other side of the street is the romantic May park, which was installed during the 1830s.  Streets in Cēsis include Lielā Katrīna, Mazā Katrīna, Mazā Kalēju, Kalēju and Lielā Līvu streets and Līvu square with wooden buildings from the late 18th and early 19th century.  Torņa Street stretches along the walls of the Medieval castle.  Outside the church is a sculpture, “As the Centuries Pass By,” and legend has it that anyone who rubs the lantern of the Old Time Man can see the future.  One of the most impressive buildings in Cēsis is St John’s Lutheran Church, which was built in the late 13th century by the Livonian Order.  The Roman-style three-segment basilica has elements of Gothic design and a 65 m steeple that was installed in 1853.  The building was reconstructed several times during the 20th century and contains grave plaques relates to masters of the Livonian Order and local bishops.  The pulpit dates back to 1748, the oak altar was manufactured in 1858, and the altar painting “Crucified One” was painted in 1862.  The windows of the altar part of the church contain artistically valuable stained glass.  The organ was manufactured in 1907 by the E.F. Walker firm, and it is one of the best concert organs in Latvia.  The solar clock with the number 1744 is in the south-wester corner of the church.  It is worth scaling the viewing tower of the church.  At its foot is Rose Square, which was a market square from the mid-13th century until 1927 and was restored in 2008.  This is the central square in the city.  During the Middle Ages, a punishment pole and the city well were here.  Rīgas Street has been the main street in the old part of the city from the very start, and here we find most of the architecturally distinguished buildings from the 18th and 19th century – the former city hall, the Fābers house and the Princess house.  At one end of the street is Liv Square, where there a church, cemetery and the Rīga gate in the city’s walls existed in the 13th century.  Today the square is decorated by a lighted fountain at a place where a well was found in the 13th century.  On the other end of the street we find a reconstruction of the foundations of the Rauna gate from the 14th and 15th century, offering a good look at Medieval walls and the size and strength of the gates.  It is commonly claimed that the national flag of Latvia was born in Cēsis, but it must be emphasised that the flag that is mentioned in chronicles was designed in Cēsis in 1279 as the ideological prototype of the current Latvian flag, while the story of the first national flag actually comes from Valmiera, where it was sewn in 1916.

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Until 13th century, Smiltene region was a part of Talava country, inhabited by Latgalians. After Crusaders invasion it was won by the Archbishop of Riga, and he built a stone castle on the steep river bank of Abuls in 1370. The following wars and epidemics did not spare the development of settlement, nor the people. Present shape of the town began to emerge in 19th century along with the vigorous activities of owner of Smiltene manor first Lieven. Until the World War I, wood working factory, hydroelectric power plant (established in 1901, first in the Baltics), and other companies were operating in Smiltene. In 1944 when the German forces retreated, much of the Smiltene historical buildings were destroyed in the fire.

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The history of Līgatne cannot be separated from the paper factory which was once the only factory of its kind in Latvia. Tours are available in the company of a guide. During the late 19th and early 20th century, the company built homes, a school, a birthing centre, a hospital, a club, a guesthouse and other buildings for its employees, and most of these buildings have survived to this day. There are more than 200 interesting underground passageways which are still used as warehouses for various items, including vegetables.

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Tāpat kā Ventspils Rātslaukums, arī Tirgus laukums ir uzskatāms par pilsētas vēsturiskā centra nozīmīgu daļu, kura apkaimē ir saglabājies senais ielu plānojums. Kādreizējā Rātsnama vietā tagad slejas kariljonu zvana pulksteņu tornis. Tas zvana katru stundu, bet 12:33:44 un 00:33:44 ar īpašu melodiju ieskandina astronomisko Ventspils laiku. Tirgus laukumā ir aka, kas saulainā laikā darbojas arī kā Saules pulkstenis. Monētu automātā var izkalt īpašu piemiņas monētu.

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The Lutheran Church of Krimulda is considered one of the oldest churches in Latvia. It was originally built in the 13th century, soon after the conquest of Kubesele and later rebuilt many times. Near the church a meditation labyrinth "Lily Flower" is set up. When Liv chief Kaupo fell during the battle at Viljandi in 1217, according to the legend, the ash was buried at the church. A small hill adjacent to Runtinupite (Runtins) is popularly known as a grave site of Kaupo, at its right bank is located ~7 m long, artificially dug Kubesele or Runtin cave. On the left bank of Runtinupite columns the Kubesele hill fort. Kubesele nature trail starts at the church. This trail leads to the Gauja River, where the Great (Runtina) stone lies. Here can be seen anchor pads installed by Gauja raftsmen. Krimulda medieval castle (4 km east of Krimulda Church) was built the second half of the 13th century in the place where the right bank of Gauja valley is split by deep ravine of Vikmeste. Castle (residence of Riga dome capitol - Riga's Archbishop Council) was an imposing building, whose big inner yard was included by 1.5 m thick defensive wall. In 1601, while retreating, Swedish military leader Heinrich Lieven blasted Krimulda castle. Now at the hill fort, grown with the forest a small castle ruins can be seen. Nearby is located air cableway and starts Krimulda mountain road. Located nearby Krimulda manor was first mentioned in writings in the 15th century. Present manor castle was built in the 19th century in neoclassical style (owner - First Lieven). During the twenties of the 20th century, the castle after its alienation became a property of the Latvian Red Cross, which established here children's sanatorium. Nowadays the castle houses rehabilitation hospital "Krimulda", but from the farm buildings, manor stables, barn, servant, manager houses and the so-called Swiss Cottage and Park have been preserved. Thematic tours are offered here. If we go down the Gauja by boat, then we will be able to take a close look at about 15 m high Velnalas cliffs. They can be well seen also from the opposite - left bank of Gauja (resting place is established). In the middle of the cliff about 19 m deep and 4.7 m high Krimulda Velnala cave is located. If we go from the Velnala cave cliffs along the lower part of the right bank of Gauja in Turaida direction, you will see Pikenes cliff, rich with sandstone outcrops. At its foot ~ 1 km long Pikenes beaver trail is established. The Little Devil's Cave (5 m long) is on the side of the trail, with the Gudribas (Wisdom) spring that springs out of the cave, as well as Aunapieres cave which is the same length as Devils cave. Small oxbow lakes also can be seen.

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The town's name in historical sources was first mentioned in 1224. In 1340 Archbishop of Riga built a stone castle at the Latgalian hill fort (now - the Lutheran Church). In 1802 (owned until 1920) Vecgulbene estate was bought by Baron G. Wolf. Manors in the surroundings of Gulbene and Vecgulbene castle substantially suffered during the Revolution in 1905 and in the further historical events. Today, there is a substantial change in the landscape, especially in the area of White Castle, where a large-scale restoration works occurred in recent years. Either way, - Gulbene is the place worth visit to get new impressions and knowledge.

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The Capital of Saaremaa island. Popular resort. The Town Hall is built in the style of Baroque.

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The most significant period for the town is the time from 1561 to 1795, when the Jelgava district is a part of the Duchy of Courland and Zemgale. When Jelgava obtains the status of residence of the Duke of (1567t) and becomes the capital of the Duchy (1616) a rapid urban development begins, which is highest of during the reign of Duke Jacob. During the reign of last two Dukes of Courland - Ernst Johann Biron and his son Peter (1775) St. Peter's Academy (Academia Petrina) - the first Latvian Institute is founded, in 1816 is founded Courland Society of Literature and Art, in 1822 the first newspaper in Latvian "The Latvian newspaper" is published, in 1802 the first Latvian theatre building is built, but in 1898- the first building intended for museum. In 1937 Latvian agriculture camera is located in the Jelgava palace, but after two years Jelgava Agriculture Academy is opened. Nearly all the town's historic buildings and art treasures perished in the summer of 1944. After the World War II, Jelgava was rebuilt. Recently the Trinity Church tower has been restored, in which now is located one of the best Latvian interactive museums (very friendly for families with children).

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This village is at the place where the Irbe (Dižirve, Īra) River flows into the sea, and it is on both shores of the river (sea side and land side).  The name of Irbe was recorded for the first time in a 1310 border agreement between the bishop of Kurzeme and the Rīga Dome Capitol.  The name of Lielirbe (Irvemūnde) was recorded for the first time in a document from an arbitration court in 1387.  At the end of the 19th century, the small port at Lielirbe was an active centre for the sale and transport of timber materials.  In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the largest number of sailing ships among villages on the western shore of Kurzeme was built there.  In 1939, the village had some 300 residents, more than 70 houses and a Baptist church which is now at the Ventspils Open Air Museum.  A narrow-gauge railroad passed through the village, which had a post and telegraph office, two grocery stores, an elementary school, a choir and a brass band.  Lielirbe was one of the largest villages to disappear after World War II.  Cultural historian Valda Marija Šuvcāne (1923-2007) was born in Lielirbe, and her daughter, Baiba Šuvcāne, is continuing her mother's work by writing important papers about life along the Livonian coastline.  By 2019, a bridge is to be reinstalled across the Irbe River.

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Kemeri (Kemmer) are mentioned in the literature sources for the first time in 1561. In the second half of the 18th century and in the beginning of the 19th century the curative properties of Kemeri sulphur spring waters and swamp mud are well known, therefore here representatives of the highest Kurzeme social circles arrive for treatment. The local foresters welcome the guests. During this time the first mud baths are organised. For some time the development of Jurmala and Kemeri beach is terminated by the Fatherland War of 1812. Two decades later – from 1833 until 1835 the benefits of Kemeri were enjoyed by General Governor of the Baltics Graf K. M. Palen, who addresses the Tsar of Russia Nicholas I for supporting further development of the health resort. Plead is supported and in 1836 Tsar allocates 700 ha of state land and grants 100 000 roubles for the construction of sanatorium and paving of the road from Kemeri till Sloka-Tukums high-way. Two years later (in 1938) the first state bath institution is opened. This is also considered the year of founding the health resort. In several stages the formation of Kemeri Landscape Park is begun, which is an important part of the health resort. In the middle and second half of the 19th century further development of the health resort is promoted by steamboat, as well as railroad traffic that are opened in 1877 from Riga till Tukums. In 1912 direct railroad line Kemeri-Moscow is opened. Early before World War I the number of patients reaches 8300 per year. The 1st battlefront of World War I is held in Kemeri swamp for several years and the health resort is significantly destroyed. Despite this fact after the war it develops rapidly and Kemeri becomes a beloved recreation place for the residents of Riga and one of the most modern health resorts in Europe. In 1924 a new bath institution with mud-baths is built in Kemeri, which at the time is one of the most modern in Europe, but in 1936 State President Kārlis Ulmanis opens one of the most prominent buildings of the first independent state of Latvia period – hotel "Ķemeri". Also after World War II – during the Soviet times the health resort is significantly expanded and almost 10 sanatoriums are established within its territory, in which about 100 doctors are employed. In 1971 Kemeri is awarded the status of All-Union health resort. From 1975 until 1985 the largest of sanatoriums is constructed in Kemeri – Līva (initially – Latvija), which has two blocks of eleven storeys. Up to 1200 patients at the same time could receive treatment at Līva, but within a year – up to 140 000 patients. The sanatorium is closed in the beginning of the 90ies of the 20th century as unprofitable. Up to 1994 five sanatoriums operate in Kemeri: "Čaika", "Daugava", "Dzimtene", "Ķemeri" and "Līva" (Latvija) and resort policlinic "Ķemeri". The latter period may be considered the declining fame period of Kemeri as a large-scale health resort.

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Vēstures avotos pirmoreiz minēta 1483. g. Pilsētas uzplaukums bija vērojams pēc dzelzceļa uzbūvēšanas 19. gs. beigās, kad barons Korfs sadalīja un iznomāja apbūvei muižas zemi. Pilsētas tiesības Priekule ieguva 1928. g. Pilsēta smagi cieta 2. pasaules kara pēdējos mēnešos, - t.s. Kurzemes katla laikā, kuru laikā tika sagrautas 410 no 450 ēkām. Mūsdienās tā ir neliela pilsētiņa ar mazstāvu apbūvi un nesteidzīgu dzīves ritmu.

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The largest town in South-Eastern Latvia is on the banks of the Daugava River, which is the border between Latvia and Belarus at this location.  The border runs down the middle of the river.  Piedruja has two parts – Piedruja and Aleksandrova, which are separated by a central street (the V 631 road).  Piedruja emerged from the Druja town that was on the left bank of the Daugava.  During the 17th century, the two parts were owned by the Stapekha dynasty of Lithuanian aristocrats.  It is worth strolling through the town, because the low-level wooden houses are reminiscent of buildings that are exhibited in open-air ethnographic museums.  Piedruja is neat and tidy, with two churches and the Daugava rock that are part of a local hiking trails.  Aleksandrova has a tourist accommodation, “Piedruja,” which offers special soirées in the Lettigalian, Russian and Belarusian style.  Please be aware that you need a temporary permit to enter the border zone.  The Border Guard facility is in Piedruja and at a place where there was a Daugava crossing point comparatively recently.

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Ja mērķis ir savākt pilnvērtīgu etnogrāfisko ciemu fotokolekciju, ir jāapskata Strazdi (no lietuviešu valodas strazdai tulkojumā nozīmē strazds), kas ir pavisam neliela apdzīvota vieta Balošas (Baluošas) ezera ziemeļu krastā. Strazdi pirmoreiz rakstos minēti 1783. g. un ciema nosaukums cēlies no kādas mežziņu dzimtas uzvārda.