No Name Description
N/A

Kretoņu (Kretuonas) ezera dienvidu krastā (ezeru gan neredz aizauguma dēļ) meklējams Kretoņu ciems. Šķiet, ka šī vieta ir „aizķērusies" pagātnē. Cauri ciemam iet viena iela, kurai abās pusēs izvietojušās 19. – 20. gs. mijā (dažas pat mazliet agrāk – 19. gs. vidū) celtās saimniecības. Te redzamas gan dzīvojamās, gan saimniecības ēkas, kuras rada etnogrāfiska brīvdabas muzeja sajūtu. Dažas no tām gan ir „padevušās" laika zobam. Lai vai kā, šis ir viens no neparastākajiem nacionālā parka etnogrāfiskajiem ciemiem, kuru pa „galveno ielu" vērts izstaigāt visā garumā. Šim, tāpat kā pārējiem etnogrāfiskajiem ciemiem ir piešķirts kultūras mantojuma objekta statuss.

N/A

Pirmo reizi vēstures avotos 1253. g. šī vieta ir minēta kā kuršu apdzīvota apmetne. Laikā no 1637. – 1639. g. te uzcēla pirmās 19 kapelas – t.s. „Krusta ceļa stacijas", kas atgādināja Jeruzalemes Krusta ceļu. Kopš tā laika Žemaišu Kalvarija ir pazīstama kā nozīmīgs svētceļnieku galamērķis. Dažas no Krusta ceļa kapelām ir veidotas 17. – 18 gs., bet citas – 19. gs. Jāatceras, ka vēl pavisam nesen – Padomju laikos svētceļniekus nežēlīgi vajāja un represēja. Mūsdienās pilsētā ir izveidots 21 svētceļnieku „pieturas punkts". Te ik gadu (parasti no 2. – 12. jūlijam) notiek Žemaišu Kalvarijas katoļu draudzes svētki, kas pulcina daudz ļaužu no dažādām Eiropas valstīm. Iespaidīgā katoļu bazilika ir slavena ar Vissvētākās Jaunavas Marijas Katoļu Ģimeņu Karalienes gleznu, kas 17. gs. atvesta no Romas. Tai piedēvē brīnumdarītājas spējas. Interesants ir pilsētas ielu tīklojums, kas atgādina 9. – 13. gs. apdzīvotas vietas ielu plānojumu. Noteikti apskatāms iespaidīgais Žemaišu Kalvarijas pilskalns, kas slejas mazās Varduvas (Varduva) upītes krastā.

N/A

Eine Floßhauptstadt Lettlands mit dem jährlichen Flößerfest im Mai.

N/A

The town of Subate was first listed in documents in 1570, when Duke Gotthard Kettler of the Duchy of Courland sold the Subāte marketplace to Count G. Plater-Sieberg. When the Plater-Sieberg dynasty converted to Catholicism in the mid-17th century, Lutherans in Subate protested by moving to the eastern bank of Lake Subate. That was the property of the Prode Estate (only ruins remain at this time), which was owned by the Osten-Sacken dynasty. In 1685, the Osten-Sackens built a Lutheran church for the “refugees,” and Jaunsubate was established around it. Both parts of the town were merged again in 1894. During Latvia’s liberation battles in 1919, Subate was liberated by Lithuanians, at which time the town was divided up between Latvia and Lithuania (though the border between the two countries was set at the previous line in 1921). The historical centre of Subate was established between the 16th and the 19th century, and it includes four churches for various congregations and low wooden buildings which stretch along narrow and curvy streets. The town is on the shores of a sub-glacial depression with Great Lake Subate and Lesser Lake Subate therein. This provides the town with unusual landscapes for Latvia.

N/A

Kemeri (Kemmer) are mentioned in the literature sources for the first time in 1561. In the second half of the 18th century and in the beginning of the 19th century the curative properties of Kemeri sulphur spring waters and swamp mud are well known, therefore here representatives of the highest Kurzeme social circles arrive for treatment. The local foresters welcome the guests. During this time the first mud baths are organised. For some time the development of Jurmala and Kemeri beach is terminated by the Fatherland War of 1812. Two decades later – from 1833 until 1835 the benefits of Kemeri were enjoyed by General Governor of the Baltics Graf K. M. Palen, who addresses the Tsar of Russia Nicholas I for supporting further development of the health resort. Plead is supported and in 1836 Tsar allocates 700 ha of state land and grants 100 000 roubles for the construction of sanatorium and paving of the road from Kemeri till Sloka-Tukums high-way. Two years later (in 1938) the first state bath institution is opened. This is also considered the year of founding the health resort. In several stages the formation of Kemeri Landscape Park is begun, which is an important part of the health resort. In the middle and second half of the 19th century further development of the health resort is promoted by steamboat, as well as railroad traffic that are opened in 1877 from Riga till Tukums. In 1912 direct railroad line Kemeri-Moscow is opened. Early before World War I the number of patients reaches 8300 per year. The 1st battlefront of World War I is held in Kemeri swamp for several years and the health resort is significantly destroyed. Despite this fact after the war it develops rapidly and Kemeri becomes a beloved recreation place for the residents of Riga and one of the most modern health resorts in Europe. In 1924 a new bath institution with mud-baths is built in Kemeri, which at the time is one of the most modern in Europe, but in 1936 State President Kārlis Ulmanis opens one of the most prominent buildings of the first independent state of Latvia period – hotel "Ķemeri". Also after World War II – during the Soviet times the health resort is significantly expanded and almost 10 sanatoriums are established within its territory, in which about 100 doctors are employed. In 1971 Kemeri is awarded the status of All-Union health resort. From 1975 until 1985 the largest of sanatoriums is constructed in Kemeri – Līva (initially – Latvija), which has two blocks of eleven storeys. Up to 1200 patients at the same time could receive treatment at Līva, but within a year – up to 140 000 patients. The sanatorium is closed in the beginning of the 90ies of the 20th century as unprofitable. Up to 1994 five sanatoriums operate in Kemeri: "Čaika", "Daugava", "Dzimtene", "Ķemeri" and "Līva" (Latvija) and resort policlinic "Ķemeri". The latter period may be considered the declining fame period of Kemeri as a large-scale health resort.

N/A

The Slutiški village is a very ethnographic village with a layout and buildings typical of the Latgale region, complete with decorated windows and facades. The Slutiški Old Believers House features a museum focusing on the cultural environment and traditions of the Old Believers. One of Latvia’s most unusual landscapes can be seen from the ancient banks of the Daugava River.

N/A

Dagda is mentioned in the historical sources of 17th century as a trader village. In 1772, Dagda district was included the Pskov province, but in 1802 - Vitebsk province. In 1905 widespread peasant unrest took place here, during which many important architectural monuments were destroyed. Town was not spared also by the two world wars. What's to see for the tourist here? In the centre of Dagda historical buildings - houses, built of red brick - the so-called "Jewish tradesmen houses" are preserved. Dagda is the only place in the Latvia, where every year is celebrated Anne's Day in the town's park!

N/A

 A long village stretching along both banks of the Lūžņa River.  In 1937, there were 36 houses and two boat piers here.  During the 1860s, ships were built here, but during the Soviet occupation, there were military bases there.  During the 1930s, the village was visited several times by the Finnish linguist Lauri Ketunen and Estonian student Oskar Lorits.  They were working on a Livonian dictionary.  Another resident of Lūžņa was the first Livonian artist, Jānis Belte (1893-1946).  The "Dēliņi" fisherman's homestead has been transferred to the Latvian Ethnographic Open-Air Museum and can be seen there.

N/A

 Ventspils Vecpilsētas vēsturiskais centrs. Nelielā Rātslaukuma (40 x 60 m) rietumu malā atrodas Starptautiskā rakstnieku un tulkotāju māja, kas ierīkota 18. gs. dzīvojamā ēkā ar baroka un klasicisma iezīmēm (19. gs. vidū te atradās pilsētas Rātsnams), bet austrumu malā – vēlīnā klasicisma stilā celtā evaņģēliski luteriskā Nikolaja baznīca. Iepretim baznīcai atrodas modernā stilā pārbūvētā Ventspils Galvenā bibliotēka un Digitālais centrs, kas ierīkots greznā 19. gs. savrupmājā.

N/A

is seen as the newest village along the Livonian coastline.  It was established during the 17th century.  Košrags had 78 residents in 1826.  The first reading school for Livonian children in the Dundaga seashore villages was opened at the Žoki homestead in 1832.  One of the teachers was Nika Polmanis, who was the first Livonian to have completed a professional education.  He also translated the Gospel of Matthew into the Eastern Livonian dialect.  Košrags had a windmill, water mill and boat building facility.  During the spring, job seekers from Saaremaa stopped here.  A port was installed in 1932, and a breakwater to collect sea fertiliser followed in 1938.  During the 1930s, Košrags was regularly visited by Finnish and Estonian linguists to study the folklore of the Livonians.  The Norpiedagi homestead was built by Livonian activist Didriķis Volganskis (1884-1968).  His son, Livonian cultural worker and pastor (in Finland) Edgars Vālgamā (Volganskis, 1912-2003) was born there.  He translated the Andrejs Pumpurs epic "Lāčplēsis" into Finnish.  Košrags today is a cultural monument of national importance.

N/A

Liela meža masīva vidū gleznainās Būkas (Būka) upes krastos starp kokiem ieslēpies teiksmainais Vaišnoriškes ciems. Šis ir viens no skaistākajiem nacionālā parka etnogrāfiskajiem ciemiem. Vaišnoriške kā apdzīvota vieta sākusi veidoties 1756. g., kad šeit sena vēsturiska ceļa malā darbojies krogs. Pirmā viensēta ciematā ir zināma no 1830. g. Šodien redzamā apbūve ir tapusi g.k. 20. gs. sākumā. Ciems ir palicis cilvēku atmiņās ar liepu medu, jo meža velšu vākšana un biškopība bija viena no galvenajām šejieniešu nodarbēm. Tagad ciemā ir piecas sētas. No Vaišnoriškes var uzsākt laivu braucienu pa seklo un dzidro Būku.

N/A

Ein ehemaliges Fischerdorf am Ufer des Kurischen Haffs. Aufgrund der Wanderdünen hat seinen Standort mehrmals seit dem Anfang des 19.Jh. geändert. Holzbebauung mit einheitlichem Stil und Traditionen.

N/A

The Capital of Latvia. The Old Town of Riga (included in UNESCO Cultural Heritage list) - an excellent medieval building monument. The pearl of Art Noveau in Europe. The former city of Hanza.

N/A

Ein einzigartiges Örtchen beiderseits des Flusses Minija, wo der Fluss eine „Hauptstraße” ist. Litauens Venedig.

N/A

Until 13th century, Smiltene region was a part of Talava country, inhabited by Latgalians. After Crusaders invasion it was won by the Archbishop of Riga, and he built a stone castle on the steep river bank of Abuls in 1370. The following wars and epidemics did not spare the development of settlement, nor the people. Present shape of the town began to emerge in 19th century along with the vigorous activities of owner of Smiltene manor first Lieven. Until the World War I, wood working factory, hydroelectric power plant (established in 1901, first in the Baltics), and other companies were operating in Smiltene. In 1944 when the German forces retreated, much of the Smiltene historical buildings were destroyed in the fire.

N/A

Bauska's name in historical sources for the first time is mentioned in 1443. This is the time when on the peninsula between Musa and Memel confluence construction of last Livonian Order castle on the present-day territory of Latvia was begun. At the castle – in Ķirbaksalā populated area so-called Vairogmiests developed. During the 17th century rapid boom of the town was observed. Here were working goldsmiths, silversmiths, carpenters, potters, shoemakers and other craftsmen. In later centuries the city suffered from wars, plague and Napoleon army. Today Bauska old town with reconstructed City Hall and the restored Bauska Castle is one of the most interesting Latvian historical town centres. Bauska is known for its annual events - Ancient Music Festival, Bauska town festival, country music festivals, and other events.

N/A

Materials of archaeological excavations show that the Ogre river banks were inhabited by the Livs. Ogre as a larger populated area and a major resort developed after the construction of Riga-Daugavpils railway in 1861. Until the World War I about 300 cottages offered their services in Ogre, most of them were destroyed during the war. The next "major" event took place 1965 when one of the largest knitwear plants in Europe was built in Ogre, which was staffed by guest workers from Vietnam and countries. Today, Ogre has still not recovered its glory of a resort, but has become a rather exclusive site of mostly low-rise residential buildings.

N/A

Ein ehemaliges Fischerdorf am Ufer des Kurischen Haffs. Hierher sind die Bewohner der Dörfern umgezogen, deren Dörfe unter dem Sand der Wanderdünen begraben wurden. Holzbebauung des 19 – 20 Jh.

N/A

(formerly Pize and Pizā in Livonian).  The current name of the village comes from a lighthouse (Mihailovskii majak) that was built during the age of the Russian Empire and named for the nephew of Tsar Alexander II.  The lighthouse that is there now is the third one to be built on the site.  It was built in 1957 and is the highest lighthouse in Latvia (57 m, can only be viewed from the outside).  The Lutheran church in Mikeļtornis was built in 1893, and nearby is the Pize Saloon (1857), which is terrible condition.  The saloon has a typical design from the 19th century and is the only venue of its type on the Livonian coastline.  The first Livonian cultural activist, Jānis Princis (1796-1868), was born in Miķeļtornis, and he and son Jānis translated the Gospel of Matthew into the Western Livonian language.  The two of them also wrote a collection of poetry, "Holy Songs and Prayers for Sailors."  The only poetry book in Latvia prior to that was published by Blind Indriķis.  A student of Vilhelms Purvītis, Livonian painter Andrejs Šulcs (1910-2006), was born at the Olmaņi homestead in Miķeļtornis.  A monument to Livonian poets was installed at the local cemetery in 1978 and was the first monument dedicated to Livonians.  There are plans to open an environmental object by artist Ģirts Burvis, "Century of Sailing Ships", in 2019.

N/A

This is an urban construction monument that was created between the 17th and 19th century, and it is of national importance.  The street layout around Jelgavas and Rātūža streets forms closed blocks of buildings.  There are Lutheran, Catholic, Orthodox and Baptist churches in Jaunjelgava.  One of the most outstanding architectural monuments is City Hall, which was built in 1912 and features Art Nouveau forms.  None of the city’s five synagogues has survived.  The historical centre of Jaunjelgava features a promenade that runs along the banks of the Daugava River.  This is a popular place for strolls, leisure and swimming.