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Kemeri (Kemmer) are mentioned in the literature sources for the first time in 1561. In the second half of the 18th century and in the beginning of the 19th century the curative properties of Kemeri sulphur spring waters and swamp mud are well known, therefore here representatives of the highest Kurzeme social circles arrive for treatment. The local foresters welcome the guests. During this time the first mud baths are organised. For some time the development of Jurmala and Kemeri beach is terminated by the Fatherland War of 1812. Two decades later – from 1833 until 1835 the benefits of Kemeri were enjoyed by General Governor of the Baltics Graf K. M. Palen, who addresses the Tsar of Russia Nicholas I for supporting further development of the health resort. Plead is supported and in 1836 Tsar allocates 700 ha of state land and grants 100 000 roubles for the construction of sanatorium and paving of the road from Kemeri till Sloka-Tukums high-way. Two years later (in 1938) the first state bath institution is opened. This is also considered the year of founding the health resort. In several stages the formation of Kemeri Landscape Park is begun, which is an important part of the health resort. In the middle and second half of the 19th century further development of the health resort is promoted by steamboat, as well as railroad traffic that are opened in 1877 from Riga till Tukums. In 1912 direct railroad line Kemeri-Moscow is opened. Early before World War I the number of patients reaches 8300 per year. The 1st battlefront of World War I is held in Kemeri swamp for several years and the health resort is significantly destroyed. Despite this fact after the war it develops rapidly and Kemeri becomes a beloved recreation place for the residents of Riga and one of the most modern health resorts in Europe. In 1924 a new bath institution with mud-baths is built in Kemeri, which at the time is one of the most modern in Europe, but in 1936 State President Kārlis Ulmanis opens one of the most prominent buildings of the first independent state of Latvia period – hotel "Ķemeri". Also after World War II – during the Soviet times the health resort is significantly expanded and almost 10 sanatoriums are established within its territory, in which about 100 doctors are employed. In 1971 Kemeri is awarded the status of All-Union health resort. From 1975 until 1985 the largest of sanatoriums is constructed in Kemeri – Līva (initially – Latvija), which has two blocks of eleven storeys. Up to 1200 patients at the same time could receive treatment at Līva, but within a year – up to 140 000 patients. The sanatorium is closed in the beginning of the 90ies of the 20th century as unprofitable. Up to 1994 five sanatoriums operate in Kemeri: "Čaika", "Daugava", "Dzimtene", "Ķemeri" and "Līva" (Latvija) and resort policlinic "Ķemeri". The latter period may be considered the declining fame period of Kemeri as a large-scale health resort.

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Ein ehemaliges Fischerdorf am Ufer des Kurischen Haffs. Hierher sind die Bewohner der Dörfern umgezogen, deren Dörfe unter dem Sand der Wanderdünen begraben wurden. Holzbebauung des 19 – 20 Jh.

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Pavilosta is a comparatively new city that has formed at the mouth of the Saka River in the Baltic Sea. True is the fact that in the medieval times the harbour of sea ships was located 6 km from the sea – at the junction of the Tebra and the Durbe Rivers. Important period in the life of the harbour was during the ruling of Duke Jacob, when sea ships arrived here. As a result of the Polish-Swedish war the Saka harbour had to be closed. The harbour that's visible nowadays in the mouth of the Saka River was formed in the middle of the 19th century at the so called Akagals fishermen village. In 1878 the river mouth was excavated and piers were built. Here two-masted ships were built. The World Wars destroyed the fleet, but the fishery traditions remained alive. In 1991 the populated area acquired the status of a city. Nowadays Pavilsota is a popular target for yachtsmen and windsurfers, as well as summer recreation place. Yachtsmen are awaited at the yacht harbour.

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Exploring of Sigulda can be started with a visit to Sigulda castle ruins. The construction of the castle was begun by the Knights of the Sword Order in 1207, but in 1236 it was rebuilt for the needs of the Livonian Order. Sigulda castle suffered much from the wars in the second half of the 16th century and in the beginning of 17th century. During the Northern War, it is burned down and is no more restored. Today south-western building of the convent and the tower of the main gate, behind which is the inner forefront of the castle with open air stage, which offers impressive views over the Gauja valley. Currently the reconstruction of castle ruins is in progress. Construction of New castle (owner - Prince Kropotkin) in the South of the Sigulda took place from the 1878 until 1881. From 1923 - 1940 the building was the Palace of Writers, but during the Soviet years - Cardiology sanatorium. Since 2003 Sigulda district council is located there. The manor complex includes wooden house (middle of 19th century), which was Kropotkin's family home, barn (turn of the 18th - 19th century), gardener's house (19th century) and a stone fencing (19th century.) If we make our way from New Castle in a north-eastern direction, after almost 2 km we will reach Vejupite ravine. There you can see the shallow (3.6 m) but high (6.1 m) in Peter's Cave and deep Pucu ravine with Krauklupite. At the conjunction of ravines of both streams rises a Satezele hill fort (plateau 90 x 75 m), where in the beginning of 13th century was the oak castle of Liv land chief (eldest) - Dabrelis. Near can be found Krauklu gorge - ravine of Vejupite left bank, with 11 m high sandstone walls and 5.2 m deep Krauklu cave. At the conjunction of Vejupite ravine and Gauja valley columns Paradise (Gleznotaju) Hill - a very picturesque place, painted and photographed since old times! The Paradise Hill can be reached with a electric vehicle. In the west part of Sigulda is located Ferris wheel (works during the summer) and Air cableway (streetcar) - the only this type of vehicle in Baltics (built in the 1969). Its self-supporting cable extends in 1060 m length and without any support joins the Gauja River valley banks between Sigulda and Krimulda ~ 40 m above Gauja River. Here you can enjoy excellent views! In the south-western part of Sigulda one can walk to mighty Beites precipice, which is split by the deep ravine of stream. On the west side of the ravine lies Keizarskats, which is located ~ 67 m above the Gauja level and offers good views of Krimulda and Turaida castle. Sight place was arranged here already in the 1862 when Russian Tsar Alexander II visited Sigulda. In the eastern part of the ravine wooden Keizarkrēsls (Emperor Stool) is located.

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Origins of Livani as a bigger place of population are linked to the 1533, when the then owner of the land Lieven established the manor and called it after his own name Lievenhof. The 1678, the first Catholic Church was built here. The city suffered considerably during the two world wars. Name of Livani is associated with the glass. In 1887 a glass factory was founded here, which today has ceased operation.

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Das bekannteste Museum der Geschichte der Bienenzucht Litauens mit den Bienenhäusern verschidener Arte, der Arbeitsmittel der Bienenzüchter, Holzskulpturen und Hönigankauf.

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A small settlement with a school, library and shop. North from the Vidale are visible remains of the windmill. Going towards the Gulf of Riga, the road crosses Shlitere Zilie mountain precipice with spectacular views during late autumn, early spring and winter, when there are no leaves on the trees and sandstone outcrops. To the left you can see Zilie mountain spring - a landscaped water taking place. Road that runs from the Vidale to Melnsils side, is called by the locals Knipeldambi. They say that it was built by the German army first During World War I, putting logs on the road and covering them with sand.

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Until 13th century, Smiltene region was a part of Talava country, inhabited by Latgalians. After Crusaders invasion it was won by the Archbishop of Riga, and he built a stone castle on the steep river bank of Abuls in 1370. The following wars and epidemics did not spare the development of settlement, nor the people. Present shape of the town began to emerge in 19th century along with the vigorous activities of owner of Smiltene manor first Lieven. Until the World War I, wood working factory, hydroelectric power plant (established in 1901, first in the Baltics), and other companies were operating in Smiltene. In 1944 when the German forces retreated, much of the Smiltene historical buildings were destroyed in the fire.

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Ļoti skaists un ainavisks etnogrāfiskais ciems Balošas (Baluošas) ezera ziemeļu krastā, netālu no diviem iepriekš minētajiem ciemiem. Te apskatāmas interesantas un skaistas koka ēkas, kas celtas no guļbaļķiem, ar niedru vai lubiņu jumtiem un izrotātas ar dažāda veida dekoratīvajiem elementiem. Pirmo reizi rakstos Šumini minēti 1784. g. Savu vārdu ciems ieguva no kādreiz dzīvojošas ģimenes uzvārda. Kā interesantākā ir jāpiemin sena klēts.

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Pilsētā nebija lielu rūpniecības uzņēmumu, un tās iedzīvotāji nodarbojās galvenokārt ar amatniecību, tirdzniecību un lauksaimniecību. Ilūkste tika pilnībā nopostīta 1. pasaules kara laikā un smagi cieta arī 2. pasaules kara laikā. Šodien Ilūkste ir klusa pierobežas mazpilsēta, ko ieskauj gleznains dabas apvidus. Apskates objekti: bijušā jezuītu klostera ēka un Ilūkstes katoļu baznīca.
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Ap 200 m garajā un izstieptās formas laukumā no 16. – 20. gs. atradās Liepājas tirgus. Laukuma malās tolaik bija izveidojusies vienstāvu apbūve – iebraucamās sētas, viesnīcas un dārzi. Līdz ar Pētertirgus izveidi 1910. gadā, izmainījās arī laukuma apveidi un to ieskaujošā apbūve. Laukuma DA malā slejas iespaidīgā Liepājas Svētās Annas Luterāņu baznīca.

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One of the youngest Latvian towns, in 2013 it will celebrate its twenty year anniversary. A number of significant scientific institutions in a Latvian scale is located in Salaspils (in Soviet times it was built as a science centre) - Institute of Biology, Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Institute of Physics, National Botanic Gardens, former Salaspils nuclear reactor and the Forest Research Institute "Silava". Over the last decade the infrastructure has been developed, as well as wide areas of private houses are developed. In 1996 a new Catholic church was built in Salaspils. Most of the town residents commute each day to Riga for work.

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The most significant period for the town is the time from 1561 to 1795, when the Jelgava district is a part of the Duchy of Courland and Zemgale. When Jelgava obtains the status of residence of the Duke of (1567t) and becomes the capital of the Duchy (1616) a rapid urban development begins, which is highest of during the reign of Duke Jacob. During the reign of last two Dukes of Courland - Ernst Johann Biron and his son Peter (1775) St. Peter's Academy (Academia Petrina) - the first Latvian Institute is founded, in 1816 is founded Courland Society of Literature and Art, in 1822 the first newspaper in Latvian "The Latvian newspaper" is published, in 1802 the first Latvian theatre building is built, but in 1898- the first building intended for museum. In 1937 Latvian agriculture camera is located in the Jelgava palace, but after two years Jelgava Agriculture Academy is opened. Nearly all the town's historic buildings and art treasures perished in the summer of 1944. After the World War II, Jelgava was rebuilt. Recently the Trinity Church tower has been restored, in which now is located one of the best Latvian interactive museums (very friendly for families with children).

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Construction of the Sigulda castle was begun by the Order of Brethren of Swords in 1207, but in 1236 it was rebuilt for the needs of the Livonian Order.  The building suffered much damage during wars in the latter half of the 16th century and the early part of the 17th century.  It was burned down during the Great Northern War and was not restored.  Visible today is the south-western wing of the castle’s convent building and the main gate tower, behind which is the internal forecastle with an open-air stage that offers an impressive view of the ancient Gauja River valley.  The new Sigulda castle was built between 1878 and 1881, and it was owned by Count Kropotkin.  From 1923 until 1940, the castle housed a centre for writers, and during the Soviet Union it was a hospital for cardiology patients.  Since 2003, the Sigulda Administrative District Council has been located here.  The buildings that have been preserved include a wooden home (mid-19th century), where the Kropotkin family used to live, a granary (late 18th or early 19th century), the home of the gardener (19th century) and a brick wall (19th century).  If we go to the north-eastern direction, we will find the Vējupīte valley less than two kilometres away.  It includes the shallow (3.6 m) but high (6.1 m) Pēteris cave and the deep Pūču valley with the little Kraukļupīte River.  At the place where the two valleys come together we find the Satezele castle hill (its flat surface is 90 x 75 m), where, in the early 13th century, the oak castle of the ruler of Livonian lands, Dabrelis, was once found.  Nearby is the Kraukļu valley, with 11 m sandstone walls and a cave that is 5.2 m deep.  Nearby is the Paradise (Painter) hill, which offers a lovely landscape that has been painted and photographed since ancient times.  There is a Ferris wheel in the western part of Sigulda that is open during the summer, as well as an aerial tram that is the only transport vehicle of its type in the Baltic States and was installed in 1969.  The cable that carries the tram is 1,060 metres long and links the shores of the ancient Gauja River valley between Sigulda and Krimulda.  The cable is approximately 40 metres above the Gauja.  The south-western part of Sigulda features the mighty Beite cliff which is split by a deep stream valley.  To the west of the cliff is the Emperor’s View viewing area that is 67 m above the Gauja and offers a good view of Krimulda and the Turaida Castle.  A viewing area was established here in 1862, when Tsar Alexander II of Russia visited Sigulda.  The wooden Emperor’s chair is to the east of the viewing area.  The Turaida Museum Reserve is in the place where the shore is split by deep valleys carved out by streams.  It features several outstanding monuments that are as much as 1,000 years old.  Of note are the Turaida Estate (21 buildings), the grave of the Rose of Turaida, the Turaida Lutheran Church (1750), which is one of the oldest wooden churches in Latvia) and the Turaida Castle.  Folksong hill, which is nearby, is used for various thematic events.

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The Slutiški village is a very ethnographic village with a layout and buildings typical of the Latgale region, complete with decorated windows and facades. The Slutiški Old Believers House features a museum focusing on the cultural environment and traditions of the Old Believers. One of Latvia’s most unusual landscapes can be seen from the ancient banks of the Daugava River.

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In a document from 1387, the village is named Minor Irva.  Until the mid-20th century, Mazirbe was the largest Livonian village on the coast of Kurzeme.  It was a fishing village and a centre for fishing.  The village had a church, school, pharmacy, forestry company, several stores, a post and telegraph office, train station, barber shop, bakery and photo workshop, as well as a brick kiln.  During the 1930s, a local fishing co-operative built a fish processing plant here.  The Livonian Association was established here in 1923, and the Livonian People's Centre was opened in 1939.  Oppoite the centre is the Stūrīši homestead (the home of the Taizel dynasty), where you can learn about everyday household objects and, by ordering it advance, taste local foods.  The first chairmen of the Livonian Association, Kārlis Stalte and Māritņš Lepste, lived in Mazirbe.  Cultural worker Kārlis Stalte (1870-1978) spent man years as the verger and organist of a church in Mazirbe.  Mārtiņš Lepste was a Livonian language teacher in the 1930s.  The former Maritime School building can be viewed from the outside.  Some 2,000 students attended the school between 1894 and 1914.  During Soviet years, the army had a base here.

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The wooden buildings with few floors emerged in the 19th century.  Tourists can look at typical closed yards, verandas, wooden elements and decorations.  The city suffered from fires in 1866 and 1938.  The Market Square is the historical centre of Ludza, while the Ludza castle hill dominates the region.  The streets of the city were established around the hill, which had an ancient Lettigalian wooden castle late in the 14th century.  The Livonian Order replaced with the mightiest brick castle in Latgale.  It was sacked in 1654 by the forces of Tsar Alexei Mikhailovich.  The castle hill offers a lovely view of Latgale and the oldest city in Latvia and its historical centre.

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Eine Floßhauptstadt Lettlands mit dem jährlichen Flößerfest im Mai.

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Third biggest island in Estonia. Full of beautiful grown junipers, little dolomite outcrop on the coast of the sea and fishermen villages on the coastline.

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Kaļķis is a populated area where dolomite is still extracted from quarries in the region (Kalnciems­2 is one such quarry). Some of the quarries are flooded.