No Name Description
N/A

On the right bank of the Bērze River and in the western part of Dobele, the castle hill and its fortified forecastle were occupied between the 10th and 13th centuries, with an ancient town at its foot (currently the square between Tērvetes Street and the Liepāja highway).  As was common, the Livonian Order used this ancient Semigallian castle hill to build a brick castle between 1335 and 1347.  The castle was sacked during the 18th century, and its fairly impressive and beautiful ruins have been conserved.  A viewing platform is part of the charm.

N/A

The complex dates back to the 17th and 18th century, when a fortress was replaced by a mansion and other buildings.  The rectangular yard that is in the centre of the state is surrounded by the mansion, two granaries with columns that were built opposite one another, a stable and a wheelhouse.  The stable and wheelhouse, the bell tower and the gate create the most impressive part of the buildings.  Bells were rung because of religious rituals, but also to inform people at the estate about everyday issues.  The silhouette of the building is reminiscent of cloisters, city halls and churches that were common in Europe in the 18th century.  In 1780, the estate was taken over by the family of Karl Otto von Löwenstern, and the mansion can only be viewed from the outside.  There is a hiking trail near the estate.

N/A

All that remains today is the governor’s house in which the Latvian author Rūdolfs Blaumanis (1863-1908) lived from 1885 until 1887, and a stable built of fieldstones.  The Central Daugava Forestry Centre of the Latvian State Forests company is located in the building.  The stone gates of the Koknese High School where once the gates of the estate.  The buildings can mostly be viewed from the outside.

 

 

N/A

This convent-type castle was built in the mid-13th century by the bishopric of Piltene.  Annexes were added in the 16th and 19th centuries to create a typical internal courtyard.  The Neo-Gothic forms of the castle’s façade date back to the 1830s.  From the 16th century to the 1920, the castle was owned by the noble Behr family.  After it was burned down during the 1905 Revolution, the castle was rebuilt in two years’ time.  The castle is known for ghost stories, tales of elf weddings, and stains of blood in the Red Room that are supposedly the result of a murder.  A fireplace was built to hide the stains, but they reappeared.  Since the privatisation of the castle, the interior has been restored with halls and cellars that are decorated with elements that are typical to the castle.  Its rooms and viewing tower are open to the public.  In the park, visitors will find the Alley of Love and the elf oak tree.

N/A

Castle's prototype is England's Windsor castle. Sangaste Castle was finished in 1883. Its last owner was Friedrich von Berg (1845. - 1938.) - known grain selector. Near the castle is a park.