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Neliela apdzīvota vieta nacionālā parka ziemeļrietumu daļā, kur kādreiz atradusies Rebases muiža. Mūsdienās no tās saglabājušās klēts atliekas, pie kurām apskatāms interesants vēstures liecinieks – sens akmens, ko izmantoja kulšanas procesā (Peksukivi).

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A monument to the founders and directors of the Ķemeri spa (1861) on the banks of the Vēršupīte.
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Near the place where the Kilmiņupe River flows into the sea is the legendary Trommel castle hill, which was a Medieval fortification.  It is some 100 m from the Kraujas homestead.  An archaeological dig in 1977 found fragments of bricks and pot-bellied stoves, which suggests that the fortifications date back to the Middle Ages.  The location also is linked to stories about a pirate, Trommel, who buried his loot here.  The holes in the area have been left behind by treasure hunters.  Trommel supposedly robbed ships in the Bay of Rīga from the shores of Kurzeme to Roņu Island.  Many ships docked here in ancient times, waiting for better winds so that they could pass by Cape Kolka.  The pirate made use of this fact, also pillaging property from sunken ships.  It is said that Trommel lived in a stone castle. (Source: Roja TIC)

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The biography of Krišjānis Valdemārs tells us that during the summer of 1839, teachers and students from the Lubezere school spent a few days on the coastline in Roja, where Valdemārs would later help to build a maritime school.  The area was breath-taking and unforgettable for the little boy.  “The noble appearance of the sea grabbed the spirit of the young man so powerfully that during those three days, I thought about nothing other than the noble sea, with childish courage that allowed me to prepare a plan for a deeper port in the Roja River so that larger boats and small ships could enter it,” Valdemārs wrote. (Source: Roja TIC)

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The cosy land road along the sea is 1 km long, and it offers a look at the wonderful aspects of the village.  To the right are rocks from the sea, as well as miniature flower gardens on the seashore with tempting benches and overturned boats.  On the side of the shore is the Kaltene library, which is more than 100 years ago.  It was initially a summer home for Baron Nolken, and it was built in 1899.  Later it was rebuilt several times and took on new roles.  An elementary school was installed here in 1926, after which it became a club and then, in 1992, a primary school once again.  The path runs along beautiful seashore homesteads, among which one can find the former homes of old fishermen and ship builders such as Burliņi.  At one time, the Žulnieki portage at Smilgas was the site of  the kiln of blacksmith Pēteris Valdemārs.  He was the main blacksmith for ships between Kaltene and Upesgrīve. (Source: Roja TIC)

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No Vilces muižas pa pastaigu taku var aiziet līdz pilskalnam (12 m virs apkārtnes, labiekārtots), kas atrodas Vilces un Rukūzes upīšu satekā. Atradumi liecina, ka cilvēku apmetne šeit ir pastāvējusi jau vidējā dzelzs laikmetā. Pilskalna piekājē atrodas atpūtai labiekārtotā Zaķu pļava. Nostāsti vēsta, ka Vilces grava bijusi laupītāja Kaupēna slēpšanās vieta.

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The Strūves Park is toward the northwest of Jēkabpils, on the left bank of the Daugava, and opposite the Ādamsona (Krustpils) island. The park was established in the 19th century as a place where the city’s residents could relax and hold celebrations. It can be said with absolute certainty that this is a place of global importance, because the park contains a memorial stone to Professor Friedrich Georg Wilhelm Struwe (1793-1864) from the University of Tartu. He was an astronomer and geodesist. The stone is at a place where Struwe completed his land survey of the Vidzeme Province of the Russian Empire. The meridian location which Struwe identified (and other points related to those locations are found in many other European countries) is on the UNESCO list of world heritage.

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The building was erected during the first period of Latvian independence, and it maintained its functions for a long time.  The building is located at Tukuma Street 30.  Beginning in 1940, the post office had an automated telephone central.  The Postal Service no longer uses it, and the building can only be viewed from the outside.

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Vāldamõ – a residential building that is yellow and has natural roofing materials.  It was built as a new farm at the beginning of the last century.  Virgo is the next homestead to the North from Vāldamõ, and it was established as a new farm in the 1920s.  The house (1930) features interesting wood carvings.  Next to the North is Fīlmaņi, which has a building that appears antique, but was built in the early 20th century as a single roof.  Silkalni is the homestead that we find if we turn to the right toward Pitrags at the crossroads.  The yellow building was built around 1906 as a single room.  Norpiedagi is to the South from Silkalni – a brown and larger house than the previous one.  The home was built around 1906 as a one-room granary by the active Liv public activist and boat builder Diriķis Volganskis (1884-1968).  His son, Edgars Valgamā, who was also a Liv cultural activist and worked as a pastor in Finland, was born here.  Anduļi can be found at the aforementioned crossroads.  This is one of the largest old farms in the village, and it is owned by the village elder.  The history of the homestead was first recorded in 1680, when it was called Kūkiņi.  The homestead includes a residential building (c. 1909), a threshing barn (1905), a granary (mid-19th century), and a smokehouse made of a boat that was cut in two.  Under the part of the threshing barn which is on the back of the dune, there is the medieval, so-called Plague cemetery.  Žoki is a homestead that is on the other side of the road from Anduļi.  The building that is there now was built on the foundation of an older one.  In the mid-19th century, Žoki was home to the first reading school for Liv children from the seashore villages of the Dundaga region.  Liv Nika Polmanis (1823-1903) worked there as a teacher.  Next to the North of Žoki is the Tilmači homestead, with several buildings that were built in the late 19th and early 20th century – a brown residential building, a stable and part of a granary.  When the residential building was restored, the owner found a board reading "1825. Kurlyandskaya gubernya."  The seven historical homesteads and buildings were at one time considered for listing on the UNESCO list of world heritage.

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Cesis Castle complex is a place where the past meets the future. 
The medieval castle provides an opportunity to get into the 800 years distant past, to climb up the Western tower with candle lanterns, observe the castle garden and park, climb down to the dungeon, as well as to see how the blacksmith is making Latgalian ornaments in his Ancient jewellery smithy. 
Right next to the ruins stands the New Castle, an 18th century castle manor house. Now it is Cesis History and Art Museum, which details the events that occured up to 800 years ago, stores the very first Latvian flag,  the first coins of the city, the Biedermeier era style interior and the only historical facial reconstruction of a Livonian woman who lived in the Medieval castle. A great ending of the visit is Lademacher tower, from where you can see a breathtaking view of the city. 
The park at the lowland of the castle’s territory was set up as a family garden. It was created by the New Castle owner Carl Gustav von Sievers. The park is like a time machine, a shelter from all the surroundings, where one can enjoy some peace of mind. It is a place where everyone feels something special, receives an indescribable pleasure just by relaxing next to the pond. 
A bit further, right next to the city center is the May park, an essential component of the urban landscape, with its illuminated fountains and black swans that are living there. It is a great place where you can relax with your family, because the park also has a children’s playground with more activities.

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Built in the turn of the19th to 20th century. Next to it-on the right bank of the river Vēršupīte, there is located one of the most popular Latvian sulphur water springs, called "Small lizard". The spring runs out from a stone-designed lizard sculptured in 1949 (Sculptor J. Bajārs). Its water is healthy for using both internally and externally. Not far from the pavilion there can be found Jānis Lībietis alley sign. J. Lībietis worked in the position of a director for the sulphur water spring authority of Kemeri from 1928 to 1944.

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In the 1960s, the Soviet Union banned individual fishing in the sea, and the motor boats which had no other purpose were simply beached in the dunes.  It is said that members of the Border Guard often set the boats on fire.  Another story is that the Border Guard banned an ancient tradition of burning old boats on Summer solstice Eve.  Along the road to the cemetery is the old net barn, which is a residential building today.

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Marking of the Jānis Lībietis Alley in the Ķemeri Park – Lībietis directed the institution which managed the Ķemeri sulphurous springs from 1928 until 1944, and the monument to him is at the end of the Jānis Lībietis Pathway
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Beliebte und eine der ältesten Straßen in Jurmala zwischen Dzintari und Majori. Die 1,1 km lange Straße mit Wirtshäusern, Sommercafés und Souvenirladen.

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This ancient Courlandian castle hill has remnants of an ancient city.  Historical sources indicate that in 1263, the Courlandians handed the castle over to the Livonian Order without a battle and that the castle was then burned down.  The name of the place, Skābaržkalns, has to do with the name of the city, because hornbeam trees in the area were once known as grobi.

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Taisnā Celtnieku iela ir bijušās Liepājas – Aizputes šaursliežu dzelzceļa (celta 1900. gadā, 49 km gara) līnijas „trase”, kuras malā (Celtnieku ielā 50) redzama bijusī dzelzceļa stacijas ēka.

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This is one of comparatively few castle hills along the banks of the Daugava River that is not overgrown with trees and bushes, which means that it has a classical castle hill form that is part of the local landscape.  The Dignāja castle hill was settled during several periods, particularly between the 5th and the 9th century AD, when it was an important centre.  Archaeologists have found that Lettigalian tribes lived here.  After the Holy Crusade invasion, the Livonian Order built a castle on the hill that has not survived.  It is said that there was once an underground passageway under the hill.  The hill itself offers a lovely view of the Daugava River valley.  World War I trenches have been preserved the area.  There was once a settlement at the foot of the hill.

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Approximately 200 metres to the North-East from the Liv People's Centre, along the Mazirbe-Košrags road, there is the Seppes homestead.  The little log granary was built in the 1920s and 1930s by an Estonian fisherman and builder who arrived in Mazirbe from Saaremaa.  He was called Jēkabs Jaga.  On the other side of the road is the Kalši home, which was built in the early 20th century.  It has been restored, but the bricks that were made in a local kiln were preserved for its walls.

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Near Mākoņkalns hill there is a trail that is mowed in the summer and leads to several historical rocks – Plakanais (Flat) rock, Āža muguras (Ram's Back) rock (on which you can clamber), and the Jaunstašuļi Velna pēdas (Devil's Footprint) rock, on the surface of which is a shape similar to a human footprint.  There are signs along the side of the road leading to the trail.

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Parkā blakus pusloka tiltiņam ir novietotas trīs milzīgas dzelzs atslēgas, kuras balsta akmens mūris un metāla arkas. Tās simbolizē trīs vēsturiskos centrus un to vienotību – Siguldu, Turaidu, Krimuldu. Dobēs pie šī objekta sezonāli zied dažādi kultūraugi.