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Piltene is one of the smallest and oldest cities in Latvia, first mentioned in 1295, and being granted the rights of a city in 1557.  Between the 14th and 16th century, Piltene was the administrative centre for the Bishopric of Kurzeme.  The historical streets that surround the castle ruins feature wooden buildings from the first half of the 19th century.  The bishop’s castle in Piltene was built at the turn of the 14th century and used until the 16th century.  Only its foundations and fragments of its tower on the banks of the Vecventa River survive.

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One of the oldest towns in Latvia, about which data can be found already beginning from 1378. As a populated area it formed at the banks of the Tebra River (the side of Riga-Prussia road), where once the fortified wooden castle Beida of the Cours Land Bandava was located. In the medieval times Aizpute was the centre of Kurzeme bishopric. After joining Kurzeme to Russia in 1795, Jews settled for living in Aizpute. Today travellers in Aizpute are most attracted by the ancient city environment that is still alive here, as well as by the historical centre of the city and the castle ruins.

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The largest town in the region dates back to the 19th century, when three local fishing villages – Neibāde, Pēterupe and Katrīnbāde – became a popular location for leisure and swimming.  This led to the construction of many summer homes, and the development of the spa was facilitated by the opening of a rail line between Rīga and Saulkrasti in 1905.  New spas and restaurants were opened, and the spa infrastructure was developed.  During the summer there were various entertainments, including balls and concerts featuring orchestras from Rīga.  Also facilitating the development of the spa was a road and railroad line between Rīga and Saulkrasti that were installed during the 1930s.  During the Soviet occupation, leisure homes, sanatoriums and new summer homes were built in Saulkrasti, which was given the status of a city.  Today Saulkrasti is attractive because of its white sand beach, as well as various annual events, the Saulriets trail, the White Dune, the unique bicycle museum, Sea Park, the “Centrs” swimming facility, Sun Square, etc.

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On the way to Turaida you must definitely stop at Gutmana cave. It is the widest (12 m) high (10 m) and in terms of volume - one of the biggest Latvian caves (cave like niche), which is also an important cultural and historical site, place rich with stories (most popular of Turaida Rose), surrounded by ancient walls and ceiling inscriptions (oldest from the end of 17th century). A spring originates from the cave; it is believed that it has healing properties. Turaida Museum reserve with Batlic scale outstanding monuments whose history stretches over 1000 years in the distant past is located at the point where the right mainland of Gauja valley is split by deep ravines of several small streams. Their exploration can be started with Turaida manor (first mentioned in 16th century), which is an outstanding example of Vidzeme manors. 21 buildings, built between the 18th century until the beginning 20th century are preserved until now. Visitors can see the manor stables, coach house, sauna, forge, fish cellar, barn, foreman house, the old residential buildings of landlord, and residential building of manor servants, oust house, etc. While walking in Turaida direction, we will reach the grave of Turaida Rose, which relates with the legend of Turaida Maija, who sacrificed her life for love. Near the grave grows a great linden tree (poor condition), wich is believed to be planted on the grave of Maija. Turaida Lutheran Church that lies further is the third church in a row and one of the oldest (1750) Latvian wooden churches – single volume wood log building with a baroque tower. Here you can see the altar and pulpit (Middle of the 18th century), altarpiece "Golgotha​​" (end of the 17th century – beginning of the 18th century) and historical exposition. Tautasdziesmu (folksongs) Park stretches at the Dainu Hill, the development of which started in 1985, noting the 150th anniversary of father of Latvian folk songs – Krisjanis Barons. More than 26 stone sculptures created by the sculptor I. Ranka are exhibited here. This is also a place of annual folklore events. Before the construction of Turaida stone castle (started in 1214), wooden Liv castle stood here. Turaida castle belonged to the Bishop. It existed for a long time - until to the 1776 when it was burned down. In 1953 an extensive restoration works was started here; upper storey of main tower, barn building (exposition on Sigulda district), semi-circular tower and castle complex in the southern enclosure was restored. Now the museum exhibition is established at the castle premises, which tells about the historical events in the surroundings.

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The Lutheran Church of Krimulda is considered one of the oldest churches in Latvia. It was originally built in the 13th century, soon after the conquest of Kubesele and later rebuilt many times. Near the church a meditation labyrinth "Lily Flower" is set up. When Liv chief Kaupo fell during the battle at Viljandi in 1217, according to the legend, the ash was buried at the church. A small hill adjacent to Runtinupite (Runtins) is popularly known as a grave site of Kaupo, at its right bank is located ~7 m long, artificially dug Kubesele or Runtin cave. On the left bank of Runtinupite columns the Kubesele hill fort. Kubesele nature trail starts at the church. This trail leads to the Gauja River, where the Great (Runtina) stone lies. Here can be seen anchor pads installed by Gauja raftsmen. Krimulda medieval castle (4 km east of Krimulda Church) was built the second half of the 13th century in the place where the right bank of Gauja valley is split by deep ravine of Vikmeste. Castle (residence of Riga dome capitol - Riga's Archbishop Council) was an imposing building, whose big inner yard was included by 1.5 m thick defensive wall. In 1601, while retreating, Swedish military leader Heinrich Lieven blasted Krimulda castle. Now at the hill fort, grown with the forest a small castle ruins can be seen. Nearby is located air cableway and starts Krimulda mountain road. Located nearby Krimulda manor was first mentioned in writings in the 15th century. Present manor castle was built in the 19th century in neoclassical style (owner - First Lieven). During the twenties of the 20th century, the castle after its alienation became a property of the Latvian Red Cross, which established here children's sanatorium. Nowadays the castle houses rehabilitation hospital "Krimulda", but from the farm buildings, manor stables, barn, servant, manager houses and the so-called Swiss Cottage and Park have been preserved. Thematic tours are offered here. If we go down the Gauja by boat, then we will be able to take a close look at about 15 m high Velnalas cliffs. They can be well seen also from the opposite - left bank of Gauja (resting place is established). In the middle of the cliff about 19 m deep and 4.7 m high Krimulda Velnala cave is located. If we go from the Velnala cave cliffs along the lower part of the right bank of Gauja in Turaida direction, you will see Pikenes cliff, rich with sandstone outcrops. At its foot ~ 1 km long Pikenes beaver trail is established. The Little Devil's Cave (5 m long) is on the side of the trail, with the Gudribas (Wisdom) spring that springs out of the cave, as well as Aunapieres cave which is the same length as Devils cave. Small oxbow lakes also can be seen.

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The ruins of the Koknese Castle are found where the Daugava and Pērse rivers flow together. The castle, which is on a floodplain, was built for the bishopric of Rīga in 1209, and it replaced an ancient Latvian castle that was made of wood. The castle was blown up by Saxon forces in 1701. A visitors centre is near the ruins, and there you can carve a Medieval coin or rent a boat to sail down the Daugava. Make sure to stroll through the Koknese park, which is alongside the ruins.

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Haapsalu was once loved by aristocrats who stayed here during summers, nowadays this town is very appealing to its visitors because of its essence - tiny streets, old wooden buildings and promenade. Worth mentioning are also town's SPAs which were one of the reasons why Haapsalu was so popular its earlier years. Interesting enough, the famous composer Tchaikovsky considered this place one of his favorite's for spending the holidays.

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The most significant period for the town is the time from 1561 to 1795, when the Jelgava district is a part of the Duchy of Courland and Zemgale. When Jelgava obtains the status of residence of the Duke of (1567t) and becomes the capital of the Duchy (1616) a rapid urban development begins, which is highest of during the reign of Duke Jacob. During the reign of last two Dukes of Courland - Ernst Johann Biron and his son Peter (1775) St. Peter's Academy (Academia Petrina) - the first Latvian Institute is founded, in 1816 is founded Courland Society of Literature and Art, in 1822 the first newspaper in Latvian "The Latvian newspaper" is published, in 1802 the first Latvian theatre building is built, but in 1898- the first building intended for museum. In 1937 Latvian agriculture camera is located in the Jelgava palace, but after two years Jelgava Agriculture Academy is opened. Nearly all the town's historic buildings and art treasures perished in the summer of 1944. After the World War II, Jelgava was rebuilt. Recently the Trinity Church tower has been restored, in which now is located one of the best Latvian interactive museums (very friendly for families with children).

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In a document from 1387, the village is named Minor Irva.  Until the mid-20th century, Mazirbe was the largest Livonian village on the coast of Kurzeme.  It was a fishing village and a centre for fishing.  The village had a church, school, pharmacy, forestry company, several stores, a post and telegraph office, train station, barber shop, bakery and photo workshop, as well as a brick kiln.  During the 1930s, a local fishing co-operative built a fish processing plant here.  The Livonian Association was established here in 1923, and the Livonian People's Centre was opened in 1939.  Oppoite the centre is the Stūrīši homestead (the home of the Taizel dynasty), where you can learn about everyday household objects and, by ordering it advance, taste local foods.  The first chairmen of the Livonian Association, Kārlis Stalte and Māritņš Lepste, lived in Mazirbe.  Cultural worker Kārlis Stalte (1870-1978) spent man years as the verger and organist of a church in Mazirbe.  Mārtiņš Lepste was a Livonian language teacher in the 1930s.  The former Maritime School building can be viewed from the outside.  Some 2,000 students attended the school between 1894 and 1914.  During Soviet years, the army had a base here.

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The largest town in South-Eastern Latvia is on the banks of the Daugava River, which is the border between Latvia and Belarus at this location.  The border runs down the middle of the river.  Piedruja has two parts – Piedruja and Aleksandrova, which are separated by a central street (the V 631 road).  Piedruja emerged from the Druja town that was on the left bank of the Daugava.  During the 17th century, the two parts were owned by the Stapekha dynasty of Lithuanian aristocrats.  It is worth strolling through the town, because the low-level wooden houses are reminiscent of buildings that are exhibited in open-air ethnographic museums.  Piedruja is neat and tidy, with two churches and the Daugava rock that are part of a local hiking trails.  Aleksandrova has a tourist accommodation, “Piedruja,” which offers special soirées in the Lettigalian, Russian and Belarusian style.  Please be aware that you need a temporary permit to enter the border zone.  The Border Guard facility is in Piedruja and at a place where there was a Daugava crossing point comparatively recently.

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Jurmala town (the second largest in Latvia) was founded in 1959, by combining Kemeri and Sloka towns in the Riga city Jurmala district. It stretches 32 km along the coastal line of Gulf of Riga. Jurmala resort once was one of the most important objects of this type in the Northern Europe. This was facilitated by the development of local and interstate transport and traffic (coaches, steamers, train). The first guests was accommodated in Dubulti, where in 1834 the first hotel was built, but in 1847 - The first wellness centre. In the 19th the first medical institution launched. Starting from 1834 the rapid construction of summer cottages began. Development of the resort was ended by the World War I. After the war the number of resort vacationers boomed from 12 thousand (in 1920) to 32 thousand (in 1935). Kemeri resort developed along with Jurmala, which received a massive of vacationers' amount during the Soviet period.
Today, Jurmala is a popular venue of concerts, festivals, exhibitions, sports competitions, and other public events.

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Cesvaine was first mentioned in written sources in 1209. For each traveller in Latvia, the town is associated with the family of Baron Woolf, who bought the Cesvaine estate in 1815. Cesvaine experienced the economic boom after establishment of Plavinas Gulbene railway. Town suffered significantly during the World War II. At the end of 2002, the Cesvaine Castle was struck by the tragedy - a fire, which damaged most of the castle. Cesvaine Castle is "recovering" by means of large public, state and local government support and still keeps the status as a significant tourism attraction in a scale of Vidzeme and Latvia.

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Neliela apdzīvota vieta, kuras apkārtnē jau izsenis iegūta kūdra un ārstniecības dūņas, kas izmantotas Ķemeru kūrortā. Kūdrā atrodas padomju laikā celtā dzelzsbetona rūpnīca, kura nodrošināja ar būvniecības materiāliem tagadējo Kauguru mikrorajonu.
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Until 13th century, Smiltene region was a part of Talava country, inhabited by Latgalians. After Crusaders invasion it was won by the Archbishop of Riga, and he built a stone castle on the steep river bank of Abuls in 1370. The following wars and epidemics did not spare the development of settlement, nor the people. Present shape of the town began to emerge in 19th century along with the vigorous activities of owner of Smiltene manor first Lieven. Until the World War I, wood working factory, hydroelectric power plant (established in 1901, first in the Baltics), and other companies were operating in Smiltene. In 1944 when the German forces retreated, much of the Smiltene historical buildings were destroyed in the fire.

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The town of Subate was first listed in documents in 1570, when Duke Gotthard Kettler of the Duchy of Courland sold the Subāte marketplace to Count G. Plater-Sieberg. When the Plater-Sieberg dynasty converted to Catholicism in the mid-17th century, Lutherans in Subate protested by moving to the eastern bank of Lake Subate. That was the property of the Prode Estate (only ruins remain at this time), which was owned by the Osten-Sacken dynasty. In 1685, the Osten-Sackens built a Lutheran church for the “refugees,” and Jaunsubate was established around it. Both parts of the town were merged again in 1894. During Latvia’s liberation battles in 1919, Subate was liberated by Lithuanians, at which time the town was divided up between Latvia and Lithuania (though the border between the two countries was set at the previous line in 1921). The historical centre of Subate was established between the 16th and the 19th century, and it includes four churches for various congregations and low wooden buildings which stretch along narrow and curvy streets. The town is on the shores of a sub-glacial depression with Great Lake Subate and Lesser Lake Subate therein. This provides the town with unusual landscapes for Latvia.

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Formed on the left side of river Emajõgi, in the valley of Doma Hill. The centre of The Old Town of Tartu is Town Hall Square with Town Hall and the fountain "The Kiss of the Students" (symbol of the city).

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Known as Alšvanga in the past, this place was mentioned for the first time in 1231 in an agreement that was signed between the deputy legate of the pope in Rome and the Courlandian tribes of the region.  The Livonian Order ruled the territory until 1561, and from 1573 until 1738 the order’s castle belonged to the von Schwerin dynasty from Pomerania.  It during the rule of this aristocratic family that a stone church was built in honour of Archangel Michael, and local residents began to convert to Catholicism.  Alsunga became the Catholic centre for all of Kurzeme, and local residents became known as the Suiti (from the Schwerin suite).

For nearly 400 years, Alsunga has been the historical centre of the Suiti territory.  This is Latvia’s most conservative region and is widely known with unusual songs, colourful folk costumes and various folk traditions and beliefs.  The Suiti have their own dialect, foods and many other things that have been long since abandoned or forgotten elsewhere in Latvia.  The religious has commingled with the folk here in one unique whole.  The Alsunga District covers 191 km2 and has some 1,500 residents.

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Der älteste und größte Kurort Litauens (seit 1794). Mikroklima (Luft der Umgebungswälder), salzhaltigee Quellen, Heilschlamm. Die Altstadt ist ein städtebauliches Denkmal.

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Schon seit der früheren Zeiten – ein Platz von der militärischen und strategischen Bedeutung. Für den Schutz des Hafens von Klaipeda wurde 1866 von preussischer Militär den Bau einer Festung angefangen. Im Laufe des 2.Weltkriegs wurde die Festung in die Luft gesprängt. Die Renovierung begann 1979.

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It is believed that at the Kezberkalnins of Limbazi has been Lemisele castle of Metsepole Liv district. It is also found in the reports that merchants travelled to this place from the sea by Svētupe and Dunezers until the 16th century. In 1223 Bishop Albert built a stone castle in Limbazi. Like Valmiera, Limbazi became the member of Hanseatic League. At the beginning of 16th century it economic role declined significantly since Svētupe and Dunezers became unusable for shipping. Between the 16th and 18th centuries, the town and its people suffered from wars, diseases and fires. As a result, the population reached its utmost fall - eight people. In the turn of 19th and 20th century and in the beginning of 20th century the economic life of the town was renewed.