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Documents show that there was a port in the Irbe valley in 1387.  Around the turn of the 19th century, sailing ships were built here.  After World War II, military bases were established here, and the village all but disappeared.

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In the 15th century, Preili manor became the property of Count Borhs family. Borhs were living here until the 60ties of 19th century. The city itself formed in the first half of the 19th century by fusion of Preili Manor, the village and free village - settlement of traders and craftsman. In the 19th century a luxurious palace was built in Preili and Landscape Park was created. Today Preili is an important economic centre of Latgale (cheese and sewing plants), where t folklore, crafts and Catholicism traditions are fostered. Preili tour in the guidance of TIC employee Irena Kjarkuza is highly recommended.

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The most significant period for the town is the time from 1561 to 1795, when the Jelgava district is a part of the Duchy of Courland and Zemgale. When Jelgava obtains the status of residence of the Duke of (1567t) and becomes the capital of the Duchy (1616) a rapid urban development begins, which is highest of during the reign of Duke Jacob. During the reign of last two Dukes of Courland - Ernst Johann Biron and his son Peter (1775) St. Peter's Academy (Academia Petrina) - the first Latvian Institute is founded, in 1816 is founded Courland Society of Literature and Art, in 1822 the first newspaper in Latvian "The Latvian newspaper" is published, in 1802 the first Latvian theatre building is built, but in 1898- the first building intended for museum. In 1937 Latvian agriculture camera is located in the Jelgava palace, but after two years Jelgava Agriculture Academy is opened. Nearly all the town's historic buildings and art treasures perished in the summer of 1944. After the World War II, Jelgava was rebuilt. Recently the Trinity Church tower has been restored, in which now is located one of the best Latvian interactive museums (very friendly for families with children).

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On the right bank of the River Pēterupe is one of the historical areas of Saulkrasti – Pēterupe Village. It is believed that the village began to form around a chapel during the so-called Swedish or Catholic times. The chapel was named after the Apostle St. Peter, and therefore the river and the village also carries his name. Pēterupe Village can be considered the oldest village in the Saulkrasti region. The oldest witnesses of the origin of Pēterupe Village are: Rectory, Pēterupe Evangelical Lutheran Church, Outpatient Clinic and the wooden buildings in the old village centre.

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Until 13th century, Smiltene region was a part of Talava country, inhabited by Latgalians. After Crusaders invasion it was won by the Archbishop of Riga, and he built a stone castle on the steep river bank of Abuls in 1370. The following wars and epidemics did not spare the development of settlement, nor the people. Present shape of the town began to emerge in 19th century along with the vigorous activities of owner of Smiltene manor first Lieven. Until the World War I, wood working factory, hydroelectric power plant (established in 1901, first in the Baltics), and other companies were operating in Smiltene. In 1944 when the German forces retreated, much of the Smiltene historical buildings were destroyed in the fire.

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Koņuciems of Pape is one of the few seashore fishing villages in Latvia to have preserved an authentic environment to the present day. The Latvian Open-Air Ethnographic Museum has a branch here, “Vītolnieki”, and this is an authentic and ancient fisherman’s farm. +371-2926-2283. The sad fact is that some people have built modern buildings in the village, and it has now lost its earlier untouched charm.

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Die zentrale und auch schönste Straße in Trakai mit bunten Holzhäusern. Eins der seltenen Kenesa-Gebetshäuser der Welt – ein eingeschossiges Holzhaus mit einem bläulichen Dach.

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The largest city near the Liv Coastline, where visitors will find the Ventspils branch of the Liv Association and the Liv ensemble "Rāndalist." In nearby Tārgale are the Liv ensembles "Kāndla" and "Piški kāndla."

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The Slutiški village is a very ethnographic village with a layout and buildings typical of the Latgale region, complete with decorated windows and facades. The Slutiški Old Believers House features a museum focusing on the cultural environment and traditions of the Old Believers. One of Latvia’s most unusual landscapes can be seen from the ancient banks of the Daugava River.

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This is a unique small town in a certain sense, and it is the only one in the Baltic States which has remained in place since the 17th and 18th century. The town is around the small Alekšupīte River, and in some places the stream runs along the walls of the buildings. Because of this fact and the many bridges that are in town, Kuldīga has become known as “the Venice of Latvia.” Baznīcas, Liepājas, Kalna and other streets are full of interesting cultural monuments.

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To the south of Koknese, the Destiny Garden is on an island that is surrounded by the waters of the Pļaviņas hydroelectric power plant (there is a bridge to the shore).  The aim of this fundamental open-air object was to commemorate people in Latvia who suffered because of totalitarian regimes.  The first work here began in 2008, and the designer of the landscape was a Japanese landscape architect, Shunmyo Masuno.  Work on the garden continues, but it is already a popular tourist destination.  The first permanent structure is a terrace that offers a view of the Koknese castle ruins and the local Lutheran church.  This means that there will be something new each time that people visit the park.  People are invited to bring rocks for this nationally important location that commemorates Latvia’s history.

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Hauptstadt von Hiiumaa.

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In 1615, Courlandian Duke Friedrich Kettler (1569-1642) allowed Bauska to build a new city hall.  At the beginning of the 17th century, Market Square in Bauska featured the largest city hall in the entire duchy.  A lack of money led to the dismantling of the hall’s tower in 1852 and its second floor in 1871.  A new city hall was built in 2011, and now Bauska can be proud of a new and outstanding tourist destination that can also be entered.  The restored city hall offers a chance for people to weigh themselves and measure their height with old-time measurements.  Each person who does so receives a certificate to attest to his or her height and weight.

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Materials of archaeological excavations show that the Ogre river banks were inhabited by the Livs. Ogre as a larger populated area and a major resort developed after the construction of Riga-Daugavpils railway in 1861. Until the World War I about 300 cottages offered their services in Ogre, most of them were destroyed during the war. The next "major" event took place 1965 when one of the largest knitwear plants in Europe was built in Ogre, which was staffed by guest workers from Vietnam and countries. Today, Ogre has still not recovered its glory of a resort, but has become a rather exclusive site of mostly low-rise residential buildings.

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Third biggest island in Estonia. Full of beautiful grown junipers, little dolomite outcrop on the coast of the sea and fishermen villages on the coastline.

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"The heart of Latgale", where during the 9th – 12th century stood a fortified Latgalian castle. In 1285 Livonian Order began the construction of stone castle instead of Latgalian castle. After the collapse of Livonia (Rezekne in the composition of Poland) the city languished. Economic life in Rezekne restored in the second half of the 18th century. After the construction of St. Petersburg – Warsaw highway (1836) and railway (1861), Rezekne became a holiday destination for holidaymakers from St. Petersburg. During the World War II, buildings of the city significantly suffered. Today the town is an important economic and cultural centre of Latgale region.

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Maza apdzīvota vieta ar dažām viensētām uz pussalas (salos tulkojumā no lietuviešu valodas nozīmē „sala") starp vairākiem ezeriem. Salos II ir viens no sešiem Augštaitijas nacionālā parka etnogrāfiskajiem ciemiem. Ciems patiks tiem, kas meklē ļoti nomaļas vietas ar vecām guļbaļķu dzīvojamām un saimniecības ēkām. No Salos II pa sauszemes maršrutu var doties pārgājienā līdz Ladakalnim un Ginuču pilskalnam (sk. iepriekš).

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Arī 18. novembra laukums. Tas sācis veidoties 18. gadsimtā kā tirgus laukums. Tā dominantes bija 1752. g. celtais rātsnams (nav saglabājies) un aptieka, kas šajā ēkā darbojas no 1810. g. līdz pat mūsdienām. 2010. gadā laukumā izveidota strūklaka, kam ir pilsētas ģerboņa forma.

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Known as Alšvanga in the past, this place was mentioned for the first time in 1231 in an agreement that was signed between the deputy legate of the pope in Rome and the Courlandian tribes of the region.  The Livonian Order ruled the territory until 1561, and from 1573 until 1738 the order’s castle belonged to the von Schwerin dynasty from Pomerania.  It during the rule of this aristocratic family that a stone church was built in honour of Archangel Michael, and local residents began to convert to Catholicism.  Alsunga became the Catholic centre for all of Kurzeme, and local residents became known as the Suiti (from the Schwerin suite).

For nearly 400 years, Alsunga has been the historical centre of the Suiti territory.  This is Latvia’s most conservative region and is widely known with unusual songs, colourful folk costumes and various folk traditions and beliefs.  The Suiti have their own dialect, foods and many other things that have been long since abandoned or forgotten elsewhere in Latvia.  The religious has commingled with the folk here in one unique whole.  The Alsunga District covers 191 km2 and has some 1,500 residents.

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Construction of the Sigulda castle was begun by the Order of Brethren of Swords in 1207, but in 1236 it was rebuilt for the needs of the Livonian Order.  The building suffered much damage during wars in the latter half of the 16th century and the early part of the 17th century.  It was burned down during the Great Northern War and was not restored.  Visible today is the south-western wing of the castle’s convent building and the main gate tower, behind which is the internal forecastle with an open-air stage that offers an impressive view of the ancient Gauja River valley.  The new Sigulda castle was built between 1878 and 1881, and it was owned by Count Kropotkin.  From 1923 until 1940, the castle housed a centre for writers, and during the Soviet Union it was a hospital for cardiology patients.  Since 2003, the Sigulda Administrative District Council has been located here.  The buildings that have been preserved include a wooden home (mid-19th century), where the Kropotkin family used to live, a granary (late 18th or early 19th century), the home of the gardener (19th century) and a brick wall (19th century).  If we go to the north-eastern direction, we will find the Vējupīte valley less than two kilometres away.  It includes the shallow (3.6 m) but high (6.1 m) Pēteris cave and the deep Pūču valley with the little Kraukļupīte River.  At the place where the two valleys come together we find the Satezele castle hill (its flat surface is 90 x 75 m), where, in the early 13th century, the oak castle of the ruler of Livonian lands, Dabrelis, was once found.  Nearby is the Kraukļu valley, with 11 m sandstone walls and a cave that is 5.2 m deep.  Nearby is the Paradise (Painter) hill, which offers a lovely landscape that has been painted and photographed since ancient times.  There is a Ferris wheel in the western part of Sigulda that is open during the summer, as well as an aerial tram that is the only transport vehicle of its type in the Baltic States and was installed in 1969.  The cable that carries the tram is 1,060 metres long and links the shores of the ancient Gauja River valley between Sigulda and Krimulda.  The cable is approximately 40 metres above the Gauja.  The south-western part of Sigulda features the mighty Beite cliff which is split by a deep stream valley.  To the west of the cliff is the Emperor’s View viewing area that is 67 m above the Gauja and offers a good view of Krimulda and the Turaida Castle.  A viewing area was established here in 1862, when Tsar Alexander II of Russia visited Sigulda.  The wooden Emperor’s chair is to the east of the viewing area.  The Turaida Museum Reserve is in the place where the shore is split by deep valleys carved out by streams.  It features several outstanding monuments that are as much as 1,000 years old.  Of note are the Turaida Estate (21 buildings), the grave of the Rose of Turaida, the Turaida Lutheran Church (1750), which is one of the oldest wooden churches in Latvia) and the Turaida Castle.  Folksong hill, which is nearby, is used for various thematic events.