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Zusammen mit der Stadt Valga in Estland ist Valka eine einzigartige grenznahe Zwillingsstadt.

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The town's name in historical sources was first mentioned in 1224. In 1340 Archbishop of Riga built a stone castle at the Latgalian hill fort (now - the Lutheran Church). In 1802 (owned until 1920) Vecgulbene estate was bought by Baron G. Wolf. Manors in the surroundings of Gulbene and Vecgulbene castle substantially suffered during the Revolution in 1905 and in the further historical events. Today, there is a substantial change in the landscape, especially in the area of White Castle, where a large-scale restoration works occurred in recent years. Either way, - Gulbene is the place worth visit to get new impressions and knowledge.

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The town of Subate was first listed in documents in 1570, when Duke Gotthard Kettler of the Duchy of Courland sold the Subāte marketplace to Count G. Plater-Sieberg. When the Plater-Sieberg dynasty converted to Catholicism in the mid-17th century, Lutherans in Subate protested by moving to the eastern bank of Lake Subate. That was the property of the Prode Estate (only ruins remain at this time), which was owned by the Osten-Sacken dynasty. In 1685, the Osten-Sackens built a Lutheran church for the “refugees,” and Jaunsubate was established around it. Both parts of the town were merged again in 1894. During Latvia’s liberation battles in 1919, Subate was liberated by Lithuanians, at which time the town was divided up between Latvia and Lithuania (though the border between the two countries was set at the previous line in 1921). The historical centre of Subate was established between the 16th and the 19th century, and it includes four churches for various congregations and low wooden buildings which stretch along narrow and curvy streets. The town is on the shores of a sub-glacial depression with Great Lake Subate and Lesser Lake Subate therein. This provides the town with unusual landscapes for Latvia.

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Одно из сравнительно редких мест, где на побережье можно понаблюдать за рыбаками в работе. Ветряная мельница «Клаюми» (1930 г.) является одним из самых высоких сельских строений. Рядом с мельницей находится Юрмалциемский Туристический информационный пункт, информационный стенд и место для отдыха.Здесь же видны старые деревянные корпуса барж, брошенных рыбаками. Экспозиция«Старинные предметы жителей Юрмалциемса» находится в восточной части поселка, где в деревянном сарае представлены собранные местными энтузиастами предметы быта и орудия труда окрестных жителей.

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Kemeri (Kemmer) are mentioned in the literature sources for the first time in 1561. In the second half of the 18th century and in the beginning of the 19th century the curative properties of Kemeri sulphur spring waters and swamp mud are well known, therefore here representatives of the highest Kurzeme social circles arrive for treatment. The local foresters welcome the guests. During this time the first mud baths are organised. For some time the development of Jurmala and Kemeri beach is terminated by the Fatherland War of 1812. Two decades later – from 1833 until 1835 the benefits of Kemeri were enjoyed by General Governor of the Baltics Graf K. M. Palen, who addresses the Tsar of Russia Nicholas I for supporting further development of the health resort. Plead is supported and in 1836 Tsar allocates 700 ha of state land and grants 100 000 roubles for the construction of sanatorium and paving of the road from Kemeri till Sloka-Tukums high-way. Two years later (in 1938) the first state bath institution is opened. This is also considered the year of founding the health resort. In several stages the formation of Kemeri Landscape Park is begun, which is an important part of the health resort. In the middle and second half of the 19th century further development of the health resort is promoted by steamboat, as well as railroad traffic that are opened in 1877 from Riga till Tukums. In 1912 direct railroad line Kemeri-Moscow is opened. Early before World War I the number of patients reaches 8300 per year. The 1st battlefront of World War I is held in Kemeri swamp for several years and the health resort is significantly destroyed. Despite this fact after the war it develops rapidly and Kemeri becomes a beloved recreation place for the residents of Riga and one of the most modern health resorts in Europe. In 1924 a new bath institution with mud-baths is built in Kemeri, which at the time is one of the most modern in Europe, but in 1936 State President Kārlis Ulmanis opens one of the most prominent buildings of the first independent state of Latvia period – hotel "Ķemeri". Also after World War II – during the Soviet times the health resort is significantly expanded and almost 10 sanatoriums are established within its territory, in which about 100 doctors are employed. In 1971 Kemeri is awarded the status of All-Union health resort. From 1975 until 1985 the largest of sanatoriums is constructed in Kemeri – Līva (initially – Latvija), which has two blocks of eleven storeys. Up to 1200 patients at the same time could receive treatment at Līva, but within a year – up to 140 000 patients. The sanatorium is closed in the beginning of the 90ies of the 20th century as unprofitable. Up to 1994 five sanatoriums operate in Kemeri: "Čaika", "Daugava", "Dzimtene", "Ķemeri" and "Līva" (Latvija) and resort policlinic "Ķemeri". The latter period may be considered the declining fame period of Kemeri as a large-scale health resort.

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Plavinas and Stukmani region was inhabited already in the third century. During the Polish-Swedish War (1600-1629) at estuary of Aivekste in the Daugava River the Swedish war camp was formed, from which are preserved fortifications - bastions. They are one of the most impressive military formations of this kind in Latvia. Plavinas as a larger populated area started to develop in the nineties of the 19th century and in the beginning of 20th century after the construction of railway. Today Plavinas are more commonly known with dolomite production sites and spring flood area.

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Liela meža masīva vidū gleznainās Būkas (Būka) upes krastos starp kokiem ieslēpies teiksmainais Vaišnoriškes ciems. Šis ir viens no skaistākajiem nacionālā parka etnogrāfiskajiem ciemiem. Vaišnoriške kā apdzīvota vieta sākusi veidoties 1756. g., kad šeit sena vēsturiska ceļa malā darbojies krogs. Pirmā viensēta ciematā ir zināma no 1830. g. Šodien redzamā apbūve ir tapusi g.k. 20. gs. sākumā. Ciems ir palicis cilvēku atmiņās ar liepu medu, jo meža velšu vākšana un biškopība bija viena no galvenajām šejieniešu nodarbēm. Tagad ciemā ir piecas sētas. No Vaišnoriškes var uzsākt laivu braucienu pa seklo un dzidro Būku.

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An ancient Latgalian settlement. During the 10th century Kraslava district was under authority of the Prince of Polotsk, but the 13th century - under the authority of the Livonian Order. Until the beginning of 18th century it existed as a manor centre. In 1729 Kraslava was bought for 1400 thalers by Johan Ludvig Plater. Plater family ruled Kraslava for two centuries. In the of the18th century Platers began construction of Krāslava palace. After first division of Poland in 1772 Latgale was annexed to Russia. Kraslava began to perish. After construction of Riga - Daugavpils - Vitebsk railway (1865) economic life flourished again. Kraslava was little affected by the World War II, therefore, early wooden buildings of 20th century remained almost untouched.

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Košrags is one of the most unusual Liv fishing villages in Latvia. From the road you can see several houses which were built for new farms in the early 20th century (Vāldamō, Virgo) or small rooms (Fīlmaņi, Silkalni) and their ancillary buildings (Norpiedagi). One of the largest farms here is the oldest one in the village – Anduļi, which dates back to 1680. The farm has a residential house, a threshing barn, a granary and a smokehouse made of a boat that was cut in half. Žoki was the farm which, in the mid-19th century, hosted the first school at which Liv children could learn to read. Several buildings from the late 19th or early 20th century have survived at Tilmači.

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Kolka (Domesnes) name was first mentioned on Mervalas Runestones in 1040, but the Kolka as the name of village (with the same name Domesnes) - 1387. Kolka history is inextricably linked with the history of the lighthouse building (see below). Domesnes name is of Scandinavian origin (religion - ritual place) generic name, which stands for Cape. It is believed that the name of the Kolka, Liv Kūolka is derived from Finnish "kolkka" or Estonian "kolgas; Kolk" related words, which means "edge", "corner", "nook". From the oldest houses of Kolka - Vecvagars, Ushu, Krogu and Sarnastu homes remained to this day.
Kolka was the only Livonian fishing village where after the establishment of Soviet border regime, intensive economic development (including fish processing) activities was maintained. The population of Kolka, unlike the rest of the Livonian villages in the middle of the century did not diminish but rather increased. It should be noted that during the Soviet era Kolka was practically closed to civil persons and Kolka had only a few "official" beaches.

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Sikrags is one of the oldest coastal Liv villages which as a Liv settlement was first mentioned in writings in 1387. During the 17th century Sikrags was one of the most important small ports in North Courland which was equipped with warehouses. During the manor times, large fields of crops stretched in the village, there were several barns, where crops was dried and processed. During the first half of the 20th century, active fishing took place at Sīkrags. There was so much fish, that they were pumped out of the boats with special fish pumps. During Soviet times this was one of the few villages where it was allowed to fish at the sea, therefore in 1955 a small fish-processing factory was built in the coastal dunes, which operated only for about ten years. When the plant was liquidated, the development of the village declined. Today there is no sign that would witness medieval port and active fishing activities at Sīkrags apart from the ruins of the mentioned factory.

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Another ancient Livonian fishing village (Lūž in Livonian).  According to documents, the village was 4 km long in 1937 and had 36 homes and two piers for boats.  The name of Lūžņa was erased from Latvian maps during the latter half of the 20th century, because local residents were evicted by the Soviet army.  Remnants of buildings put up by the military can still be seen along with the narrow-gauge railroad station in the western part of the former village.

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Ģipka is a village that once was the site of the first maritime school in Kurzeme.  It was opened in 1869, just a few years after a similar school in Ainaži.  This was a Category 2 maritime school, which trained helmsmen for long-distance trips and captains for short-distance trips.  The school was moved to Mazirbe in 1894.  Before the maritime school, the building housed a different kind of school, and a second floor was added in 1867 specifically for the maritime school.  Today this is a residential building.  During 28 years, the school trained more than 200 professional sailors, and it was of great importance in facilitating ship building in shoreline Liv villages. (Source: Roja TIC)

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The former name of Jurkalne was Feliksbergu, which when translated means "the lucky mountain". The populated area acquired its name of Jurkalne in 1925. Today Jurkalne is not only a popular tourist sightseeing location (Jurkalne Bluffs), but also one of the rare places in the world, where the blue cows can be seen.

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For the first time Valmiera is mentioned in the historical sources in 1323. Until the 13th century this place was in the composition of Talava, inhabited by Latgalians. Construction of Valmiera medieval castle began in the beginning of the 13th century, but in 1283, between the Gauja River and Rate River towered church. Location near to the Tartu-Pskov and Novgorod trade routes greatly facilitated the economic development of the populated area. During the 14th-16th century Valmiera was a part of the Hanseatic League. It suffered greatly from wars, epidemics and fires in 16th to 18th century. In the second half of the 19th century the economic boom started again. It was also facilitated by the building of wooden bridge across the Gauja in 1866 and Riga-Pskov railway opened in 1899. Historic centre is destroyed in 1944. During post-war years, large industrial companies such as - Valmiera glass fiber factory (to this day) are opeating in the town. Today, Valmiera is economic, educational and sports centre of Vidzeme.

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The wooden buildings with few floors emerged in the 19th century.  Tourists can look at typical closed yards, verandas, wooden elements and decorations.  The city suffered from fires in 1866 and 1938.  The Market Square is the historical centre of Ludza, while the Ludza castle hill dominates the region.  The streets of the city were established around the hill, which had an ancient Lettigalian wooden castle late in the 14th century.  The Livonian Order replaced with the mightiest brick castle in Latgale.  It was sacked in 1654 by the forces of Tsar Alexei Mikhailovich.  The castle hill offers a lovely view of Latgale and the oldest city in Latvia and its historical centre.

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Located in the northern part of Valmiera, the Valmiermuiža Estate mansion (Neo-Baroque Style) was built between 1764 and 1771 by Prince August Friedrich of Schleswig, Holstein and Soderburg.  Over the course of time it has been owned by other people.  According to modern evidence, the mansion was a one-story building with a Baroque tower and a two-story addition in the early 20th century, which made it appropriate as a summer home and hunting lodge.  The building burned down in 1918.  Two years later, Valmiermuiža became a prison camp for captured soldiers.  Later the addition to the mansion was restored and used as an elementary school.  In 1936, the building became a prison, and it was once again a prison camp for captured soldiers during World War II.  Later the building burned down again, and the ruins were removed.  Still surviving is the Valmiermuiža tower, with ceiling paintings that are a cultural monument, as is the surrounding park.  The Valmiermuiža brewery is alongside the historical monument, thus providing second wind for the whole region.

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Ekenäs Old Town with its wooden houses spreads out to the seashore. The street names tell the story of the life of the townspeople and how they got along hundreds of years ago. Here, the streets have stayed the same since the 16th century. Street names such as the Hatter's Street (Hattmakaregatan), Linen Weaver's Street (Linvävaregatan), Cloth Weaver's Street (Handskmakaregatan), Smith's Street (Smedsgatan) and Tanner's Street (Garvaregatan) reveal that Barcken's peninsula in Ekenäs once was populated by skilled craftsmen.

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Pilsētas rajons dienvidos no Ventas grīvas, kura mūsdienās redzamā mazstāvu koka apbūve sāka veidoties 19. gs. vidū. Ostgala pirmsākumi meklējami 1836. g., kad Krievijas valdība, solot priekšrocības, aicināja apkārtnes zvejniekus apdzīvot smilšaino un kustīgo kāpu pārņemto piekrastes daļu. Ostgals ir atzīts par valsts nozīmes pilsētbūvniecības pieminekli.

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Tukums in the historical sources is mentioned in 1253 agreement of the Livonian Order and the Bishop on the division of Kursa. If the town's name is translated from the Liv language, it means "a pile, mountains of sand". at the beginning of 14th century German merchants and craftsmen settlement was formed at the Livonian Order stone castle, whose flowering was facilitated by the proximity of Riga - Prussian road. Later the city was largely influenced by the construction of Riga - Tukums railway in1877. During the Soviet period the on the eastern outskirts of Tukums, the largest Soviet military airfield and military town in the Baltic States was deployed. Today Tukums is a district centre of the same name with a wide range of services offered to tourists.