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Eine Hafenstadt. In der Altstadt ist das älteste Straßennetz erhalten. Holzbebauung des 19. Jh. im Stadtbezirk Ostgals. Die Promenade der Ostas Straße mit der Burg des Livländischen Ordens, dem Ausflugsschiff  „Hercogs Jēkabs”, dem Denkmal für Kr. Valdemars und den kleinen architektonischen Formen.

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Saldus is mentioned in the historical documents already in 1253. Until the 13th century an ancient Cours castle Salden was located here, which is also represented in the coat of arms of the town. Around the 1341 Livonian Order built a castle near the Cours hill fort, where settlement formed. Its peak of development, like the other settlements of Courland, was during the reign of Duke Jacob 1642 – 1682. 1856 is mentioned as the year of the foundation of Saldus, when restoration of town perished during the Northern War begun. At the end of the World War II a big fights took place at the town, but town remained in German-occupied part of Latvian until the May 8, 1945. Modern Saldus attracts with its activities - town days, the music festival "Saldus Saule", as well as a variety of sightseeing objects, among which A/S 'Druvas Partika" can be mentioned, where you can watch how the ice cream is made and Saldus Food Factory, where you can taste the delicious candy "Gotina" and watch the production process.

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Die zentrale und auch schönste Straße in Trakai mit bunten Holzhäusern. Eins der seltenen Kenesa-Gebetshäuser der Welt – ein eingeschossiges Holzhaus mit einem bläulichen Dach.

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Pavilosta is a comparatively new city that has formed at the mouth of the Saka River in the Baltic Sea. True is the fact that in the medieval times the harbour of sea ships was located 6 km from the sea – at the junction of the Tebra and the Durbe Rivers. Important period in the life of the harbour was during the ruling of Duke Jacob, when sea ships arrived here. As a result of the Polish-Swedish war the Saka harbour had to be closed. The harbour that's visible nowadays in the mouth of the Saka River was formed in the middle of the 19th century at the so called Akagals fishermen village. In 1878 the river mouth was excavated and piers were built. Here two-masted ships were built. The World Wars destroyed the fleet, but the fishery traditions remained alive. In 1991 the populated area acquired the status of a city. Nowadays Pavilsota is a popular target for yachtsmen and windsurfers, as well as summer recreation place. Yachtsmen are awaited at the yacht harbour.

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Ein ehemaliges Fischerdorf am Ufer des Kurischen Haffs. Aufgrund der Wanderdünen hat seinen Standort mehrmals seit dem Anfang des 19.Jh. geändert. Holzbebauung mit einheitlichem Stil und Traditionen.

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Construction of the Sigulda castle was begun by the Order of Brethren of Swords in 1207, but in 1236 it was rebuilt for the needs of the Livonian Order.  The building suffered much damage during wars in the latter half of the 16th century and the early part of the 17th century.  It was burned down during the Great Northern War and was not restored.  Visible today is the south-western wing of the castle’s convent building and the main gate tower, behind which is the internal forecastle with an open-air stage that offers an impressive view of the ancient Gauja River valley.  The new Sigulda castle was built between 1878 and 1881, and it was owned by Count Kropotkin.  From 1923 until 1940, the castle housed a centre for writers, and during the Soviet Union it was a hospital for cardiology patients.  Since 2003, the Sigulda Administrative District Council has been located here.  The buildings that have been preserved include a wooden home (mid-19th century), where the Kropotkin family used to live, a granary (late 18th or early 19th century), the home of the gardener (19th century) and a brick wall (19th century).  If we go to the north-eastern direction, we will find the Vējupīte valley less than two kilometres away.  It includes the shallow (3.6 m) but high (6.1 m) Pēteris cave and the deep Pūču valley with the little Kraukļupīte River.  At the place where the two valleys come together we find the Satezele castle hill (its flat surface is 90 x 75 m), where, in the early 13th century, the oak castle of the ruler of Livonian lands, Dabrelis, was once found.  Nearby is the Kraukļu valley, with 11 m sandstone walls and a cave that is 5.2 m deep.  Nearby is the Paradise (Painter) hill, which offers a lovely landscape that has been painted and photographed since ancient times.  There is a Ferris wheel in the western part of Sigulda that is open during the summer, as well as an aerial tram that is the only transport vehicle of its type in the Baltic States and was installed in 1969.  The cable that carries the tram is 1,060 metres long and links the shores of the ancient Gauja River valley between Sigulda and Krimulda.  The cable is approximately 40 metres above the Gauja.  The south-western part of Sigulda features the mighty Beite cliff which is split by a deep stream valley.  To the west of the cliff is the Emperor’s View viewing area that is 67 m above the Gauja and offers a good view of Krimulda and the Turaida Castle.  A viewing area was established here in 1862, when Tsar Alexander II of Russia visited Sigulda.  The wooden Emperor’s chair is to the east of the viewing area.  The Turaida Museum Reserve is in the place where the shore is split by deep valleys carved out by streams.  It features several outstanding monuments that are as much as 1,000 years old.  Of note are the Turaida Estate (21 buildings), the grave of the Rose of Turaida, the Turaida Lutheran Church (1750), which is one of the oldest wooden churches in Latvia) and the Turaida Castle.  Folksong hill, which is nearby, is used for various thematic events.

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Arī 18. novembra laukums. Tas sācis veidoties 18. gadsimtā kā tirgus laukums. Tā dominantes bija 1752. g. celtais rātsnams (nav saglabājies) un aptieka, kas šajā ēkā darbojas no 1810. g. līdz pat mūsdienām. 2010. gadā laukumā izveidota strūklaka, kam ir pilsētas ģerboņa forma.

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Vom 18. Jh wurde die Stadt ein russischer Marinestützpunkt. Von 1962 bis 1994 war Paldiski ein Übungszentrum für atomare U-Boote der Sowjetischen Marine mit zwei auf dem Festland befindlichen Kernreaktoren (ung. 16.000 Beschäftigte) und eine "geschlossene Stadt".

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Neliela apdzīvota vieta, kuras apkārtnē jau izsenis iegūta kūdra un ārstniecības dūņas, kas izmantotas Ķemeru kūrortā. Kūdrā atrodas padomju laikā celtā dzelzsbetona rūpnīca, kura nodrošināja ar būvniecības materiāliem tagadējo Kauguru mikrorajonu.
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For the first time, Balvi as populated area was mentioned in 1224. In the turn of 19th and 20th century, Balvi as manor and the parish centre formed as a larger settlement. During the Latvian freedom fights in 1919 Balvi was a place of establishment of Latgale guerrilla regiment. In 1926 Balvi obtained village rights, but by the 1928 became a town. During the World War II, while retreating, the German burnt down Balvi almost completely. People of Balvi are proud that the sun rises here about three minutes earlier than in the capital. Also the centre of the town has changed over the recent years.

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Evidence found at Dievukalns tells that Baltic tribes lived at this place 3,000 years ago the, but in 7th and 9th here at the Daugava Livs tribes settled. Bishop of Riga built stone castle at the bank of the river Daugava (first mentioned in the 1229), whose ruins you can see today as well. Lielvarde is an inspiration for such people of cultural awakening time as Andrejs Pumpurs (1841-1902) and Auseklis (1850-1879). During World War I (almost three years Daugava served as front line) Lielvarde was completely destroyed. After the World War II, here, as well as elsewhere in the Latvian territory, begins the establishment of collective farms. During this time Lielvarde became known for another symbol - "Lacplesa" beer. Today Lielvarde is a favourite of travellers, who have chosen to make their route along the right bank of the Daugava.

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Kemeri (Kemmer) are mentioned in the literature sources for the first time in 1561. In the second half of the 18th century and in the beginning of the 19th century the curative properties of Kemeri sulphur spring waters and swamp mud are well known, therefore here representatives of the highest Kurzeme social circles arrive for treatment. The local foresters welcome the guests. During this time the first mud baths are organised. For some time the development of Jurmala and Kemeri beach is terminated by the Fatherland War of 1812. Two decades later – from 1833 until 1835 the benefits of Kemeri were enjoyed by General Governor of the Baltics Graf K. M. Palen, who addresses the Tsar of Russia Nicholas I for supporting further development of the health resort. Plead is supported and in 1836 Tsar allocates 700 ha of state land and grants 100 000 roubles for the construction of sanatorium and paving of the road from Kemeri till Sloka-Tukums high-way. Two years later (in 1938) the first state bath institution is opened. This is also considered the year of founding the health resort. In several stages the formation of Kemeri Landscape Park is begun, which is an important part of the health resort. In the middle and second half of the 19th century further development of the health resort is promoted by steamboat, as well as railroad traffic that are opened in 1877 from Riga till Tukums. In 1912 direct railroad line Kemeri-Moscow is opened. Early before World War I the number of patients reaches 8300 per year. The 1st battlefront of World War I is held in Kemeri swamp for several years and the health resort is significantly destroyed. Despite this fact after the war it develops rapidly and Kemeri becomes a beloved recreation place for the residents of Riga and one of the most modern health resorts in Europe. In 1924 a new bath institution with mud-baths is built in Kemeri, which at the time is one of the most modern in Europe, but in 1936 State President Kārlis Ulmanis opens one of the most prominent buildings of the first independent state of Latvia period – hotel "Ķemeri". Also after World War II – during the Soviet times the health resort is significantly expanded and almost 10 sanatoriums are established within its territory, in which about 100 doctors are employed. In 1971 Kemeri is awarded the status of All-Union health resort. From 1975 until 1985 the largest of sanatoriums is constructed in Kemeri – Līva (initially – Latvija), which has two blocks of eleven storeys. Up to 1200 patients at the same time could receive treatment at Līva, but within a year – up to 140 000 patients. The sanatorium is closed in the beginning of the 90ies of the 20th century as unprofitable. Up to 1994 five sanatoriums operate in Kemeri: "Čaika", "Daugava", "Dzimtene", "Ķemeri" and "Līva" (Latvija) and resort policlinic "Ķemeri". The latter period may be considered the declining fame period of Kemeri as a large-scale health resort.

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This is a unique small town in a certain sense, and it is the only one in the Baltic States which has remained in place since the 17th and 18th century. The town is around the small Alekšupīte River, and in some places the stream runs along the walls of the buildings. Because of this fact and the many bridges that are in town, Kuldīga has become known as “the Venice of Latvia.” Baznīcas, Liepājas, Kalna and other streets are full of interesting cultural monuments.

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The history of Cēsis begins at the Riekstu hill, which is 18 m high and the surrounding area.  There was a wooden castle built by the Vendian tribe that stood there from the 11th to the 13th century.  The hill is in the central part of the castle’s park, and it offers a fine view of the park, a pond and the ruins of the Cēsis Castle.  A long staircase leads to the hill.  The Cēsis Castle was built in the early 13th century as the residence of masters of the Livonian Order, and it was one of the most fortified forts in the Baltic region.  Alongside is the New Cēsis Castle, which was built in 1777 in a place where gate fortifications had been before.  The building houses the Cēsis Museum of History and Art, and an annex contains the Castle Visitor Centre and the Cēsis Tourism Information Centre.  From the tower of the castle, we get a good view of the castle ruins, St John’s Lutheran Church and the northern stretches of the city.  Opposite the new castle is the stable of the Cēsis Castle Estate and a wheelhouse (both from the first half of the 19th century).  Today these house the Cēsis Exhibition Hall.  Other buildings include a granary, a hut for coachmen and an old brewery.  On the other side of the street is the romantic May park, which was installed during the 1830s.  Streets in Cēsis include Lielā Katrīna, Mazā Katrīna, Mazā Kalēju, Kalēju and Lielā Līvu streets and Līvu square with wooden buildings from the late 18th and early 19th century.  Torņa Street stretches along the walls of the Medieval castle.  Outside the church is a sculpture, “As the Centuries Pass By,” and legend has it that anyone who rubs the lantern of the Old Time Man can see the future.  One of the most impressive buildings in Cēsis is St John’s Lutheran Church, which was built in the late 13th century by the Livonian Order.  The Roman-style three-segment basilica has elements of Gothic design and a 65 m steeple that was installed in 1853.  The building was reconstructed several times during the 20th century and contains grave plaques relates to masters of the Livonian Order and local bishops.  The pulpit dates back to 1748, the oak altar was manufactured in 1858, and the altar painting “Crucified One” was painted in 1862.  The windows of the altar part of the church contain artistically valuable stained glass.  The organ was manufactured in 1907 by the E.F. Walker firm, and it is one of the best concert organs in Latvia.  The solar clock with the number 1744 is in the south-wester corner of the church.  It is worth scaling the viewing tower of the church.  At its foot is Rose Square, which was a market square from the mid-13th century until 1927 and was restored in 2008.  This is the central square in the city.  During the Middle Ages, a punishment pole and the city well were here.  Rīgas Street has been the main street in the old part of the city from the very start, and here we find most of the architecturally distinguished buildings from the 18th and 19th century – the former city hall, the Fābers house and the Princess house.  At one end of the street is Liv Square, where there a church, cemetery and the Rīga gate in the city’s walls existed in the 13th century.  Today the square is decorated by a lighted fountain at a place where a well was found in the 13th century.  On the other end of the street we find a reconstruction of the foundations of the Rauna gate from the 14th and 15th century, offering a good look at Medieval walls and the size and strength of the gates.  It is commonly claimed that the national flag of Latvia was born in Cēsis, but it must be emphasised that the flag that is mentioned in chronicles was designed in Cēsis in 1279 as the ideological prototype of the current Latvian flag, while the story of the first national flag actually comes from Valmiera, where it was sewn in 1916.

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Palanga is known to be the biggest by-the-sea resort in Lithuania because of its seacoast's main attractions - dunes and white sand. And because Palanga is a resort there are plenty of cafes, restaurants, bars and more for those who would like to enjoy a meal or a drink, for those who like active sport - there is possibility to cycle, go horseback riding, swim and much more. 

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A small town on the way from Riga to Bauska. Town's name is first mentioned in written sources in 1492. Here you can see Lutheran Church and former Manor Park

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From the 6th century until the 8th century instead of the current Grobina the largest known Scandinavian trade and warrior colony in the Baltic States was located. Settlers from the inlands of Gotland and Sweden established their settlement at the hillock that was then located at the bank of the navigable Alande River. It is believed that the Cours Castle – Seeburg mentioned in the chronicles of the 9th century was located exactly here. After the loss of the order castle in the 13th century Grobina became the centre of the region. The most ancient construction of the city was formed around Lielā Street, as well as around Saules and Parka Streets.

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Ein der ethnografischen Dörfer in Dzūkija mit Holzgebäuden und Kruzifix.

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This is an ancient Liv village, known as Mustanumm in the Livonian language.  Livs lived here until the mid-20th century.  The Landmann, Moritz and Ottomer families built three sailing ships in Melnsils, where the Baķupīte River flows into the Bay of Rīga.  Two locations of cultural and historical importance in Melnsils are the ancient cult location that is the Baķi castle hill, and the castle hill of a sea pirate Trommel. (Source: Roja TIC)

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Tukums in the historical sources is mentioned in 1253 agreement of the Livonian Order and the Bishop on the division of Kursa. If the town's name is translated from the Liv language, it means "a pile, mountains of sand". at the beginning of 14th century German merchants and craftsmen settlement was formed at the Livonian Order stone castle, whose flowering was facilitated by the proximity of Riga - Prussian road. Later the city was largely influenced by the construction of Riga - Tukums railway in1877. During the Soviet period the on the eastern outskirts of Tukums, the largest Soviet military airfield and military town in the Baltic States was deployed. Today Tukums is a district centre of the same name with a wide range of services offered to tourists.